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    <p>This dataset provides accurate, high-resolution (30 m) / high-frequency (monthly) / continuous (no gaps due to cloud) actual evapotranspiration (AET) for Australia using the CMRSET algorithm. The CMRSET algorithm uses reflective remotely sensed indices to estimate AET from potential evapotranspiration (PET; calculated using daily gridded meteorological data generated by the Bureau of Meteorology). Blending high-resolution / low-frequency AET estimates (e.g., Landsat and Sentinel-2) with low-resolution / high-frequency AET estimates (e.g., MODIS and VIIRS) results in AET data that are high-resolution / high-frequency / continuous (no gaps due to cloud) and accurate. These are all ideal characteristics when calculating the water balance for a wetland, paddock, river reach, irrigation area, landscape or catchment. </p><p> Accurate AET information is important for irrigation, food security and environmental management. Like many other parts of the world, water availability in Australia is limited and AET is the largest consumptive component of the water balance. In Australia 70% of available water is used for crop and pasture irrigation and better monitoring will support improved water use efficiency in this sector, with any water savings available as environmental flows. Additionally, ground-water dependent ecosystems (GDE) occupy a small area yet are "biodiversity hotspots", and knowing their water needs allows for enhanced management of these critical areas in the landscape. Having high-resolution, frequent and accurate AET estimates for all of Australia means this AET data source can be used to model the water balance for any catchment / groundwater system in Australia. </p><p> Details of the CMRSET algorithm and its independent validation are provided in Guerschman, J.P., McVicar, T.R., Vleeshouwer, J., Van Niel, T.G., Peña-Arancibia, J.L. and Chen, Y. (2022) Estimating actual evapotranspiration at field-to-continent scales by calibrating the CMRSET algorithm with MODIS, VIIRS, Landsat and Sentinel-2 data. Journal of Hydrology. 605, 127318, doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2021.127318</p> <p> <i>We strongly recommend users to use the TERN CMRSET AET V2.2</i>. Details of the TERN CMRSET AET V2.2 data product generation are provided in McVicar, T.R., Vleeshouwer, J., Van Niel, T.G., Guerschman, J.P., Peña-Arancibia, J.L. and Stenson, M.P. (2022) Generating a multi-decade gap-free high-resolution monthly actual evapotranspiration dataset for Australia using Landsat, MODIS and VIIRS data in the Google Earth Engine platform: Development and use cases. Journal of Hydrology (In Preparation).

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    <br>This release consists of flux tower measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer using eddy covariance techniques. Data were processed using PyFluxPro (v3.5.0) as described by Isaac et al. (2017). PyFluxPro produces a final, gap-filled product with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) partitioned into Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER).</br><br> Great Western Woodlands (GWW) comprise a 16 million&nbsp;ha mosaic of temperate woodland, shrubland and mallee vegetation in south-west Western Australia. The region has remained relatively intact since European settlement, owing to the variable rainfall and lack of readily accessible groundwater. The woodland component is globally unique in that nowhere else do woodlands occur at as little as 220&nbsp;mm mean annual rainfall. Further, other temperate woodlands around the world have typically become highly fragmented and degraded through agricultural use. Great Western Woodlands Site was established in 2012 in the Credo Conservation Reserve. The site is in semi-arid woodland and was operated as a pastoral lease from 1907 to 2007. The core 1&nbsp;ha plot is characterised by <em>Eucalyptus salmonophloia</em> (salmon gum), with <em>Eucalyptus salubris</em> and <em>Eucalyptus clelandii</em> dominating other research plots. The flux station is located in salmon gum woodland.

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    This data release consists of flux tower measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer in semi-arid eucalypt woodland using eddy covariance techniques. It been processed using PyFluxPro (v3.3.3) as described in Isaac et al. (2017), <a href="https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-2903-2017">https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-2903-2017</a>. PyFluxPro takes data recorded at the flux tower and process this data to a final, gap-filled product with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) partitioned into Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER). For more information about the processing levels, see <a href="https://github.com/OzFlux/PyFluxPro/wiki">https://github.com/OzFlux/PyFluxPro/wiki</a>. <br /><br /> The Great Western Woodlands (GWW) comprise a 16 million hectare mosaic of temperate woodland, shrubland and mallee vegetation in south-west Western Australia. The region has remained relatively intact since European settlement, owing to the variable rainfall and lack of readily accessible groundwater. The woodland component is globally unique in that nowhere else do woodlands occur at as little as 220 mm mean annual rainfall. Further, other temperate woodlands around the world have typically become highly fragmented and degraded through agricultural use. The Great Western Woodlands Site was established in 2012 in the Credo Conservation Reserve. The site is in semi-arid woodland and was operated as a pastoral lease from 1907 to 2007. The core 1 ha plot is characterised by <em>Eucalyptus salmonophloia</em> (salmon gum), with <em>Eucalyptus salubris</em> and <em>Eucalyptus clelandii</em> dominating other research plots. The flux station is located in Salmon gum woodland. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/great-western-woodlands-supersite/ . <br /><br />

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    <br>This release consists of flux tower measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer using eddy covariance techniques. Data were processed using PyFluxPro (v3.4.15) as described by Isaac et al. (2017). PyFluxPro produces a final, gap-filled product with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) partitioned into Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER).</br><br> Great Western Woodlands (GWW) comprise a 16 million&nbsp;ha mosaic of temperate woodland, shrubland and mallee vegetation in south-west Western Australia. The region has remained relatively intact since European settlement, owing to the variable rainfall and lack of readily accessible groundwater. The woodland component is globally unique in that nowhere else do woodlands occur at as little as 220&nbsp;mm mean annual rainfall. Further, other temperate woodlands around the world have typically become highly fragmented and degraded through agricultural use. Great Western Woodlands Site was established in 2012 in the Credo Conservation Reserve. The site is in semi-arid woodland and was operated as a pastoral lease from 1907 to 2007. The core 1&nbsp;ha plot is characterised by <em>Eucalyptus salmonophloia</em> (salmon gum), with <em>Eucalyptus salubris</em> and <em>Eucalyptus clelandii</em> dominating other research plots. The flux station is located in salmon gum woodland.

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    <br>This release consists of flux tower measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer using eddy covariance techniques. Data were processed using PyFluxPro (v3.4.17) as described by Isaac et al. (2017). PyFluxPro produces a final, gap-filled product with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) partitioned into Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER).</br><br> Great Western Woodlands (GWW) comprise a 16 million&nbsp;ha mosaic of temperate woodland, shrubland and mallee vegetation in south-west Western Australia. The region has remained relatively intact since European settlement, owing to the variable rainfall and lack of readily accessible groundwater. The woodland component is globally unique in that nowhere else do woodlands occur at as little as 220&nbsp;mm mean annual rainfall. Further, other temperate woodlands around the world have typically become highly fragmented and degraded through agricultural use. Great Western Woodlands Site was established in 2012 in the Credo Conservation Reserve. The site is in semi-arid woodland and was operated as a pastoral lease from 1907 to 2007. The core 1&nbsp;ha plot is characterised by <em>Eucalyptus salmonophloia</em> (salmon gum), with <em>Eucalyptus salubris</em> and <em>Eucalyptus clelandii</em> dominating other research plots. The flux station is located in salmon gum woodland.

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    This data release consists of flux tower measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer in semi-arid eucalypt woodland using eddy covariance techniques. It been processed using PyFluxPro (v3.3.0) as described in Isaac et al. (2017), <a href="https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-2903-2017">https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-2903-2017</a>. PyFluxPro takes data recorded at the flux tower and process this data to a final, gap-filled product with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) partitioned into Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER). For more information about the processing levels, see <a href="https://github.com/OzFlux/PyFluxPro/wiki">https://github.com/OzFlux/PyFluxPro/wiki</a>. <br /><br /> The Great Western Woodlands (GWW) comprise a 16 million hectare mosaic of temperate woodland, shrubland and mallee vegetation in south-west Western Australia. The region has remained relatively intact since European settlement, owing to the variable rainfall and lack of readily accessible groundwater. The woodland component is globally unique in that nowhere else do woodlands occur at as little as 220 mm mean annual rainfall. Further, other temperate woodlands around the world have typically become highly fragmented and degraded through agricultural use. The Great Western Woodlands Site was established in 2012 in the Credo Conservation Reserve. The site is in semi-arid woodland and was operated as a pastoral lease from 1907 to 2007. The core 1 ha plot is characterised by <em>Eucalyptus salmonophloia</em> (salmon gum), with <em>Eucalyptus salubris</em> and <em>Eucalyptus clelandii</em> dominating other research plots. The flux station is located in Salmon gum woodland. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/great-western-woodlands-supersite/ . <br /><br />

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    This dataset consists of measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer in temperate eucalypt woodland using eddy covariance techniques. <br /><br /> The Great Western Woodlands (GWW) comprise a 16 million hectare mosaic of temperate woodland, shrubland and mallee vegetation in south-west Western Australia. The region has remained relatively intact since European settlement, owing to the variable rainfall and lack of readily accessible groundwater. The woodland component is globally unique in that nowhere else do woodlands occur at as little as 220 mm mean annual rainfall. Further, other temperate woodlands around the world have typically become highly fragmented and degraded through agricultural use. The Great Western Woodlands Site was established in 2012 in the Credo Conservation Reserve. The site is in semi-arid woodland and was operated as a pastoral lease from 1907 to 2007. The core 1 ha plot is characterised by <em>Eucalyptus salmonophloia</em> (salmon gum), with <em>Eucalyptus salubris</em> and <em>Eucalyptus clelandii</em> dominating other research plots. The flux station is located in Salmon gum woodland. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/great-western-woodlands-supersite/ . <br /><br />This data is also available at http://data.ozflux.org.au .

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    <br>This release consists of flux tower measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer using eddy covariance techniques. Data were processed using PyFluxPro (v3.4.7) as described by Isaac et al. (2017). PyFluxPro produces a final, gap-filled product with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) partitioned into Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER).</br><br> Great Western Woodlands (GWW) comprise a 16 million&nbsp;ha mosaic of temperate woodland, shrubland and mallee vegetation in south-west Western Australia. The region has remained relatively intact since European settlement, owing to the variable rainfall and lack of readily accessible groundwater. The woodland component is globally unique in that nowhere else do woodlands occur at as little as 220&nbsp;mm mean annual rainfall. Further, other temperate woodlands around the world have typically become highly fragmented and degraded through agricultural use. Great Western Woodlands Site was established in 2012 in the Credo Conservation Reserve. The site is in semi-arid woodland and was operated as a pastoral lease from 1907 to 2007. The core 1&nbsp;ha plot is characterised by <em>Eucalyptus salmonophloia</em> (salmon gum), with <em>Eucalyptus salubris</em> and <em>Eucalyptus clelandii</em> dominating other research plots. The flux station is located in salmon gum woodland.

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    This data contains a once-off general structural description according to the National Vegetation Information System (NVIS) level 5 for the core 1 hectare plot in the Great Western Woodlands site in 2013. Dominant growth form, cover, height and species (up to 5 species in order of dominance) for up to 3 sub-stratum per traditional strata (Ground, Mid and Upper).

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    This data contains a list of all vascular plants surveyed in the Robson Creek Rainforest site in 2012.