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air temperature

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    The project is focused on the topic, 'enhanced heat tolerance of virus-infected aphids lead to niche expansion and reduced interspecific competition. The two aphid species studied are <i>Rhopalosiphum padi</i> and <i>Rhopalosiphum maidis</i>. The project had some of the following objectives: [1] Spatial distribution of two aphid species on the host plants [2] Upper thermal limits of two aphid species. [3] Effects of the viral infection on the host plant thermal profile. [4] Levels of expression of heat shock protein genes of virus-free and viruliferous aphids. [5] Locomotor capacity of aphids, effects of viruses on the locomotor capacity. [6] Effects of viral infection, temperature, and competition on the lifespan and fecundity of <i>R. padi</i> [7] Effects of viral infection, temperature, and competition on the lifespan and fecundity of <i>R. maidis</i> [8] Temperature of acrylic tubes used on aphid experiments. [9] Thermal lethal dose 50 of virus-free and viruliferous aphids [10] Thermal preference of virus-free and viruliferous aphids. This information can be very useful for ecologist working on insect population dynamics as well as physiologist and eco-physiologists doing meta-analyses of expression of heat shock protein genes induced by symbionts.

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    The acquisition of sunphotometer measurements are critical to capture vital data on atmospheric properties during airborne hyperspectral imaging campaigns as well as for measurements coinciding with the overpass of satellite sensors. The atmospheric properties measured are used in atmospheric correction of the remotely sensed image data. This data is primarily for input into atmospheric correction systems. It may also prove of use in validation of aerosol products such as MOD04 and the reflectance change method developed as part of CRC-SI project 4.1 which may be integrated into the Auscover 19 band reflectance product processing. It can also be used to check methods that produce water vapour directly from the data (SODA). The MicroTops instruments referred to here capture solar radiance data in 5 wavelengths which are used to extract information on aerosol optical thickness and water vapour content. These two key parameters of interest are used as inputs for the atmospheric correction of remotely sensed image data.

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files for TERN Cumberland Plain Woodland SuperSite. Long-term recordings of the environment can be used to identify sound sources of interest, characterise the soundscape, aid in the assessment of fauna biodiversity, monitor temporal trends and track environmental changes.</p> <p>Cumberland Plain Woodland SuperSite was established in 2012 in a protected remnant of Shale Gravel Transition Forest, located on the Hawkesbury Campus of the University of Western Sydney in New South Wales. The vegetation at the site is dominated by <em>Eucalyptus moluccana</em> and <em>E. fibrosa</em>, which have hosted a population of mistletoe (<em>Amyema miquelii</em>); a subcanopy of <em>Melaleuca decora</em> is visible in some gaps. The ecosystem is subject to pressure from altered fire regimes, urban development, conversion to agriculture and extreme climate events. However, the forest patch at the site is in excellent condition with the exception of edge effects. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/cumberland-plain-supersite/.</p> <p>In 2011 an acoustic recorder was set up to collect audio data for a total of 12 hours per day, split between six hours around dawn and six hours around dusk. A second recorder was added in 2012, and two more were added in 2014. The recording schedule aimed at capturing morning and evening bird choruses while minimizing memory and battery requirements. A long-term spectrogram has been generated for each audio file to aid in data exploration. The sensors also recorded temperature, minimum- maximum- and mean-sound pressure levels.</p> <p>Data are made available through the data link. For downloading large amount of data, please follow these instructions <a href="https://ternaus.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/TERNSup/pages/2530148353/How+to+download+TERN+s+acoustic+data+in+bulk">How to download TERN's acoustic data in bulk</a></p>

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files for Karawatha Peri-Urban SuperSite. Karawatha Peri-Urban SuperSite was established in 2007 and decommissioned in 2018. The site was located in eucalypt forest at Karawatha Forest. For additional site information, see <a href="https://deims.org/f15bc7aa-ab4a-443b-a935-dbad3e7101f4">Karawatha Peri-Urban SuperSite</a></p> <p>A recorder was initially set up for three months in 2012 to collect acoustic data across different plots within the site. A second recorder was set up in 2014. This collected audio data for a total of 12 hours per day, split between six hours around dawn and six hours around dusk. The recording schedule aimed at capturing morning and evening bird choruses while minimizing memory and battery requirements. A long-term spectrogram has been generated for each audio file to aid in data exploration. The sensor also recorded temperature, minimum- maximum- and mean-sound pressure levels.</p> <p>Data are made available through the data link. For downloading large amount of data, please follow these instructions <a href="https://ternaus.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/TERNSup/pages/2530148353/How+to+download+TERN+s+acoustic+data+in+bulk">How to download TERN's acoustic data in bulk</a></p>

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files for TERN Whroo Dry Eucalypt SuperSite. Long-term recordings of the environment can be used to identify sound sources of interest, characterise the soundscape, aid in the assessment of fauna biodiversity, monitor temporal trends and track environmental changes.</p> <p>The site was established in 2011 in box woodland dominated by <em>Eucalyptus microcarpa</em> (grey box) and <em>Eucalyptus leucoxylon</em> (yellow gum). Smaller numbers of <em>Eucalyptus sideroxylon</em> (ironbark) and <em>Acacia pycnantha</em> (golden wattle) are also found on site. Elevation of the site is close to 165 m and mean annual precipitation from a nearby Bureau of Meteorology site measure 558 mm. Maximum temperatures range from 29.8°C (in January) to 12.6°C (in July), while minimum temperatures range from 14.2°C (in February) to 3.2°C (in July). Maximum temperatures vary on a seasonal basis by approximately 17.2°C and minimum temperatures by 11.0°C. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/whroo-dry-eucalypt-supersite/.</p> <p>In 2012 an acoustic recorder was set up to collect audio data for a total of 12 hours per day, split between six hours around dawn and six hours around dusk. The recording schedule aimed at capturing morning and evening bird choruses while minimizing memory and battery requirements. A long-term spectrogram has been generated for each audio file to aid in data exploration. The sensor also recorded temperature, minimum- maximum- and mean-sound pressure levels.</p> <p>Data are made available through the data link. For downloading large amount of data, please follow these instructions <a href="https://ternaus.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/TERNSup/pages/2530148353/How+to+download+TERN+s+acoustic+data+in+bulk">How to download TERN's acoustic data in bulk</a></p>

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files for TERN Calperum Mallee SuperSite. Long-term recordings of the environment can be used to identify sound sources of interest, characterise the soundscape, aid in the assessment of fauna biodiversity, monitor temporal trends and track environmental changes.</p> <p>The site was established in 2010 and is located on Calperum Station, near Renmark, in South Australia. The property was a pastoral grazing lease for nearly 150 years, and suffered grazing-induced modifications to its ecosystems that are now being actively restored following removal of sheep in 1994. The area includes mallee woodlands and riverine vegetation. A significant amount of the mallee woodlands was burnt in January 2014. The mallee species are multi-stemmed eucalyptus trees (<em>Eucalyptus dumosa</em>, <em>E. incrassata</em>, <em>E. oleosa</em> and <em>E. socialis</em>) while the sparsely distributed mid-storey species come from <em>Eremophila</em>, <em>Hakea</em>, <em>Olearia</em>, <em>Senna</em> and <em>Melaleuca</em> genera. The spaced understory is predominately clumps of spiny grass (<em>Triodia spp.</em>). For additional site information, see <a href="https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/calperum-mallee-supersite">Daintree Rainforest SuperSite</a></p> <p>In 2013 two acoustic recorders were set up to collect audio data for a total of 12 hours per day, split between six hours around dawn and six hours around dusk. The recording schedule aimed at capturing morning and evening bird choruses while minimizing memory and battery requirements. A long-term spectrogram has been generated for each audio file to aid in data exploration. The sensor also recorded temperature, minimum- maximum- and mean-sound pressure levels.</p> <p>Data are made available through the data link. For downloading large amount of data, please follow these instructions <a href="https://ternaus.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/TERNSup/pages/2530148353/How+to+download+TERN+s+acoustic+data+in+bulk">How to download TERN's acoustic data in bulk</a></p>

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files for TERN Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite. Long-term recordings of the environment can be used to identify sound sources of interest, characterise the soundscape, aid in the assessment of fauna biodiversity, monitor temporal trends and track environmental changes.</p> <p>Tumbarumba SuperSite was established in 2000 by CSIRO and started measurements in 2001. The 1 ha SuperSite plot was established in 2015 in a collaboration with TERN. The overstorey is dominated by <em>Eucalyptus delegatensis</em> (Alpine Ash) and <em>Eucalyptus dalrympleana</em> (Mountain Gum). For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/tumbarumba-wet-eucalypt-supersite/ .</p> <p>In 2012 two acoustic recorders were set up to collect audio data for a total of 12 hours per day, split between six hours around dawn and six hours around dusk. The recording schedule aimed at capturing morning and evening bird choruses while minimizing memory and battery requirements. A long-term spectrogram has been generated for each audio file to aid in data exploration. The sensors also recorded temperature, minimum- maximum- and mean-sound pressure levels. </p> <p>Data are made available through the data link. For downloading large amount of data, please follow these instructions <a href="https://ternaus.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/TERNSup/pages/2530148353/How+to+download+TERN+s+acoustic+data+in+bulk">How to download TERN's acoustic data in bulk</a></p>

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files for TERN Wombat Stringybark Eucalypt SuperSite. Long-term recordings of the environment can be used to identify sound sources of interest, characterise the soundscape, aid in the assessment of fauna biodiversity, monitor temporal trends and track environmental changes.</p> <p>The site was established in 2010 in the Wombat State Forest in Central Victoria. The site is dry eucalypt forest with main species <em>Eucalyptus obliqua</em>, <em>Eucalyptus radiata</em> and <em>Euclayptus rubida</em>. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/wombat-stringybark-eucalypt-supersite/.</p> <p>In 2013 an acoustic recorder was set up to collect audio data for a total of 12 hours per day, split between six hours around dawn and six hours around dusk. The recording schedule aimed at capturing morning and evening bird choruses while minimizing memory and battery requirements. Ther recorder was intially installed near the flux tower. In July 2017 it was moved to the centre of the core 1&nbsp;Ha plot. A long-term spectrogram has been generated for each audio file to aid in data exploration. The sensor also recorded temperature, minimum- maximum- and mean-sound pressure levels.</p> <p>Data are made available through the data link. For downloading large amount of data, please follow these instructions <a href="https://ternaus.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/TERNSup/pages/2530148353/How+to+download+TERN+s+acoustic+data+in+bulk">How to download TERN's acoustic data in bulk</a></p>

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files for Litchfield Savanna SuperSite. Litchfield Savanna SuperSite was established in 2013 in Litchfield National Park. Site selection was influenced by the history of long-term monitoring work undertaken in this area by the Darwin Centre for Bushfire Research (formerly Bushfires NT). The core 1 ha plot is dominated by <em>Eucalyptus miniata</em> and <em>Eucalyptus tetrodonta</em>. The site is representative of the dominant ecosystem type across northern Australia: frequently burnt tropical savanna in high rainfall areas. For additional site information, see <a href="https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/litchfield-savanna-supersite">Litchfield Savanna SuperSite</a></p> <p>In 2015 an acoustic recorder was set up on the main flux tower. In 2016 a second record was set up on mini tower N.&nbsp;5. The two recorders collected audio data for a total of 12 hours per day, split between six hours around dawn and six hours around dusk. The recording schedule aimed at capturing morning and evening bird choruses while minimizing memory and battery requirements. A long-term spectrogram has been generated for each audio file to aid in data exploration. The sensors also recorded temperature, minimum- maximum- and mean-sound pressure levels.</p> <p>Data are made available through the data link. For downloading large amount of data, please follow these instructions <a href="https://ternaus.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/TERNSup/pages/2530148353/How+to+download+TERN+s+acoustic+data+in+bulk">How to download TERN's acoustic data in bulk</a></p>

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    This data set is a compilation of individual tree and shrub above-ground biomass (dry weight), stem diameter, height, and associated auxiliary information about the sites from which the trees or shrubs were sampled. The data were derived from numerous different projects over the last 5 decades. However, the project under which support was given to collate these datasets was Australia's Department of the Environments Methodology Development Program's Complex Wood System Project (MDP-CWS). The objective of the MDP-CWS project was to develop tools and information to underpin increased land manager participation in the domestic carbon market; the Emissions Reduction Fund (ERF). However, the intention is that this database will be expanded over time and have much greater use than just supporting carbon accounting methodologies. See publication for details: "Keryn I. Paul, John Larmour, Alison Specht, Ayalsew Zerihun, Peter Ritson, Stephen H. Roxburgh, Stan Sochacki, Tom Lewis, Craig V.M. Barton, Jacqueline R. England, Michael Battaglia, Anthony O'Grady, Elizabeth Pinkard, Grahame Applegate, Justin Jonson, Kim Brooksbank, Rob Sudmeyer, Dan Wildy, Kelvin D. Montagu, Matt Bradford, Don Butler, Trevor Hobbs, Testing the generality of below-ground biomass allometry across plant functional types, Forest Ecology and Management. 432: 102-114. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2018.08.043. Paul, K.I., Larmour, J., Specht, A., Zerihun, A., Ritson, P., Roxburgh, S.H., Sochacki, S., Lewis, T., Barton, C.V.M., England, J.R., Battaglia, M., O’Grady, A., Pinkard, E., Applegate, G., Jonson, J., Brooksbank, K., Sudmeyer, R., Wildy, D., Montagu, K.D., Bradford, M., Butler, D., Hobbs, T., 2019. Testing the generality of below-ground biomass allometry across plant functional types. Forest Ecology and Management 432, 102–114. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2018.08.043