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    Ecosystem flux data from the Warra Flux Tower, Tasmania.The flux tower is installed in a stand of tall, mixed-aged E. obliqua forest (77 and >250 years-old) with a rainforest understorey and a dense man-fern (Dicksonia antarctica) ground-layer, on a small flat of elevation 100 m adjacent to the Huon River.The climate of Warra is classified as temperate with a mild summer and no dry season. Mean annual precipitation is 1700 mm with a relatively uniform seasonal distribution. Summer temperatures peak in January (min. 8.4°C – max 19.2°C) with winter temperatures reaching their lowest in July (min 2.6°C – max 8.4°C).Eucalyptus obliqua forests dominate the vegetation below 650 m where they exist as fire-maintained communities. On fertile soils these forests attain mature heights in excess of 55m: the tallest E. obliqua within the LTER reaches a height of 90m. The understorey vegetation progresses from wet sclerophyll (dominated by Pomaderris apatala and Acacia dealbata) to rainforest (dominated by Nothofagus cunninghamii, Atherosperma moschatum, Eucryphia lucida and Phyllocladus aspleniifolius) with increasing time intervals between fire events.The site supports prodigous quantities of coarse woody debris as is characteristic of these fire-maintained eucalypt forests on fertile sites in southern Tasmania. The soil at the flux site is derived from Permian mudstone and has a gradational profile with a dark brown organic clayey silt topsoil overlying a yellow brown clay.The instruments are mounted at the top of an 80m tall guyed steel lattice tower. Supplementary measurements above the canopy include temperature, humidity, windspeed, wind direction, rainfall, incoming and reflected shortwave radiation and net radiation. An open-path gas analyser (EC150) was replaced by a closed-path gas analyser (EC155) at the end of Jan 2015.Soil moisture content is measured using Time Domain reflectometry, while soil heat fluxes and temperature are also measured.Micro-meteorology (CO2, H2O, energy fluxes), meteorology (temp, humidity, wind speed and direction, rainfall) taken from the Warra Flux Site from 2013 to late 2016. Data incomplete due to ongoing problems since changing the open-path IRGA to a closed path system (CPEC200) during 2015. Soil data (moisture, heat flux, temp) complete for time period.Data processed to L3 with OzFluxQC version 2.8.4

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    This service provides access to ecosystem flux data from Samford in Queensland. The site is is located on an improved (Paspalum dilatum) pasture in a humid subtropical climatic region experiencing intense urbanisation.

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    The Great Western Woodlands (GWW) comprise a 16 million hectare mosaic of temperate woodland, shrubland and mallee vegetation in south-west WA. The region is extraordinary in that it has remained relatively intact since European settlement, owing to the variable rainfall and lack of readily accessible groundwater.The woodland component is globally unique in that nowhere else do woodlands occur at as little as 220 mm mean annual rainfall. Further, other temperate woodlands around the world have typically become highly fragmented and degraded through agricultural use.The flux site is located in Salmon gum (Eucalyptus salmonophloia) woodland in the northern part of the Great Western Woodlands at mean annual rainfall of c. 240 mm.The site was established in December 2012. It is located on Credo Station, 110km NNW of Kalgoorlie, WA, and is managed by the CSIRO Land and Water Flagship external link (Floreat).

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    This service provides access to ecosystem flux data from Warra in Tasmania. The site is installed in a stand of tall, mixed-aged E. obliqua forest (77 and >250 years-old) with a rainforest understorey and a dense man-fern (Dicksonia antarctica) ground-layer.

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    This service provides access to ecosystem flux data from Sturt Plains in the Northern Territory. The flux tower site is located on a low lying plain dominated by Mitchell Grass (gen. Astrebla) 280km north of Tennant Creek.

  • This service provides access to evaporation, transpiration and evapotranspiration calculated across Australia at 0.05 degrees for 2003 to 2013 using the Maximum Entropy Production algorithm with input data from the MODIS sensor.

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    This service provides access to Vertical plant profiles for the Australian continent derived through integration of ICESat GLAS waveforms with ALOS PALSAR and Landsat data products.

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    This service provides access to ecosystem flux data from an Almond Orchard in South Australia's Riverland. Site established in August 2008 and decommissioned in June 2009.

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    Heatwaves are defined as unusually high temperature events that occur for at least three consecutive days with major impacts to human health, economy, agriculture and ecosystems. This dataset provides time-series of heatwave characteristics such as peak temperature, number of events, frequency and duration from 1950 to 2016 in Australia. The analysis were based on daily minimum and maximum temperature obtained from the Australian Water Availability Project (AWAP). The data is available as spatial time-series (5km grid-cell) and aggregated time-series for all Local Government Areas in Australia.

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    The Whroo flux station is located approximately 45km south west of Shepparton, Victoria.It was established in October 2011 and is managed by The University of Western Australia.The flux tower site was classified as box woodland, dominated by two main Eucalypt species: Eucalyptus microcarpa (Grey Box) and Eucalyptus leucoxylon (Yellow Gum). Elevation of the site is close to 165 m and mean annual precipitation from a nearby Bureau of Meteorology site measured 558 mm. Maximum temperatures ranged from 29.8oC (in January) to 12.6oC (in July), while minimum temperatures ranged from 14.2oC (in February) to 3.2oC (in July). Maximum temperatures varied on a seasonal basis by approximately 17.2oC and minimum temperatures by 11.0oC.The instrument mast is 36m tall. Heat, water vapour and carbon dioxide measurements are taken using the open-path eddy flux technique. Temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind direction, rainfall, incoming and reflected shortwave radiation and net radiation were measured above the canopy. Soil heat fluxes were measured and soil moisture content was gathered using time domain reflectometry.