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    <p>Fixed cameras installed at Gingin Banksia Woodland SuperSite provide a time series of fine scale data as a long-term record of vegetation structure and condition. This dense time series of phenocam images provides data for analysis of ecological responses to climate variability, and when consolidated across the entire terrestrial ecosystem research network, supports calibration and validation of satellite-derived remote sensing data, ensuring delivery of higher quality results for broader scale environmental monitoring products. </p> <p> Images have been captured for the understorey continuously since 2012, while images from overstorey positions are available for 2012, 2014, 2015 and 2018-2020. Images are captured at least hourly during daylight hours. New cameras will be operational at the site from the second quarter of 2021. </p> <p> The Gingin Banksia Woodland SuperSite was established in 2011 and is located in a natural woodland of high species diversity with an overstorey dominated by Banksia species. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/gingin-banksia-woodland-supersite/. </p><p> Other images collected at the site include photopoints, digital hemispheric photography (DHP), panoramic landscape and ancillary images of fauna and flora. </p>

  • This service provides access to evaporation, transpiration and evapotranspiration calculated across Australia at 0.05 degrees for 2003 to 2013 using the Maximum Entropy Production algorithm with input data from the MODIS sensor.

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    This service provides access to Vertical plant profiles for the Australian continent derived through integration of ICESat GLAS waveforms with ALOS PALSAR and Landsat data products.

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    <p>Digital Cover Photography (DCP) upward-looking images are collected to capture vegetation cover within the core hectare at the Litchfield Savanna SuperSite. These images can be used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI), Crown Cover or Foliage Projective Cover (FPC). </p><p> The Litchfield Savanna SuperSite was established in 2013 in Litchfield National Park. Site selection was influenced by the history of long-term monitoring work undertaken in this area by the Darwin Centre for Bushfire Research (formerly Bushfires NT). The core 1ha plot is dominated by Eucalyptus miniata. The site is representative of the dominant ecosystem type across northern Australia: frequently burnt tropical savanna in high rainfall areas. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/litchfield-savanna-supersite/ . </p><p> Photopoints are also collected at the site. </p>

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    <p>Digital Cover Photography (DCP) upward-looking images were collected annually to capture vegetation cover at the TERN Karawatha Peri-Urban SuperSite. These images can be used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI), Crown Cover or Foliage Projective Cover (FPC). </p><p> The Karawatha Peri-Urban SuperSite was established in 2007 and decommissioned in 2018. The site was located in Eucalypt forest at Karawatha Forest. For additional site information, see https://deims.org/f15bc7aa-ab4a-443b-a935-dbad3e7101f4 . </p><p> Other images collected at the site include photopoints and ancilliary images of fauna and flora. </p>

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    <p>Digital Hemispherical Photography (DHP) upward-looking images are collected twice per year to capture vegetation and crown cover at the Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite. These images are used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI). The images are captured at the times of estimated maximum and minimum LAI. </p> <p> The Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite was established in 2012 and is located in a stand of tall, mixed-aged <em>Eucalyptus obliqua</em> forest (1.5, 77 and &gt;250 years-old) with a rainforest / wet sclerophyll understorey and a dense man-fern (<em>Dicksonia antarctica</em>) ground-layer. The site experienced a fire in January 2019, which consumed the ground layer and killed a high proportion of the understorey trees but stimulated dense seedling regeneration. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/warra-tall-eucalypt-supersite/. </p><p> Other images collected at the site include photopoints, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed under and overstorey cameras, panoramic landscape and ancillary images of fauna and flora. </p>

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    <p>Digital Cover Photography (DCP) upward-looking images are collected up to twice per year to capture vegetation cover at Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite. These images can be used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI), Crown Cover or Foliage Projective Cover (FPC). </p><p> The Tumbarumba Flux site was established in 2000 and started measuring in 2001. The 1 hectare (ha) SuperSite plot was established in 2015. Preliminary images have been captured since 2000 using various sampling strategies and protocols. Since 2015 the 1 ha Supersite has had a consistent DCP protocol implemented twice per year. The overstorey is dominated by <em>Eucalyptus delegatensis</em> and <em>Eucalyptus dalrympleana</em>. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/tumbarumba-wet-eucalypt-supersite/ .</p><p> Other images collected at the site include photopoints, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed under and overstorey cameras, and ancillary images of fauna and flora. </p>

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    This dataset is modelled national pasture productivity. It describes the dynamics in grassland/pasture Gross Primary Production (GPP), Net Primary Production (NPP) and Carbon mass. GPP indicates total rate of carbon fixed through photosynthesis, in units gC/m2/day. It is the GPP of grasses only and so describes the production of grasslands and pastures. GPP is estimated separately for C3 and for C3 grasses using the Diffuse model (Donohue et al. 2014, see publication links). NPP is the net rate of carbon fixed through photosynthesis (GPP minus plant respiration) for grasses, in units of gC/m2/day. Grass carbon mass is the above-ground mass of grasslands and pastures, estimated using the CSP model. These are estimated using the unpublished CSP model (v2) for both live and senesced mass in units t/ha. Biomass is typically approximated as double the carbon mass. Inputs include MODIS MOD13Q1, minimum and maximum air temperature, elevation data and rainfall as described in the lineage section.

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    The Landsat-derived fractional cover layer gives the amount of bare ground, green vegetation, and dead vegetation for each pixel on a specific date. The landscape of NSW undergoes a large variation in greenness throughout the seasonal and drought cycles. Information about the variation in greenness can be useful for a variety of mapping and planning tasks. Areas of green vegetation are important for native species habitat and human recreation activities. Green areas in the landscape are often related to the availability of near surface water or recent inundation, such as bogs, swamps and mires. These green areas are important for native plants and animals as locations of food and water in dry times. The green fraction has been analysed for a sequence of images to show how long an area stays green following a greening event, such as grass growth in response to rainfall. The map of green accumulation for NSW was created from Landsat images from 1988 to 2012. Areas exhibiting the highest values are the areas of NSW that respond with high green cover for a long period after a greening event.

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    <p>Digital Hemispherical Photography (DHP) upward-looking images are collected three times per year to capture vegetation and crown cover at the Gingin Banksia Woodland SuperSite. These images are used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI). </p> <p> The Gingin Banksia Woodland SuperSite was established in 2011 and is located in a natural woodland of high species diversity with an overstorey dominated by Banksia species. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/gingin-banksia-woodland-supersite/. </p><p> Other images collected at the site include digital cover photography (DCP), photopoints, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed under and overstorey cameras and ancillary images of fauna and flora. </p>