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    <p>Digital Hemispherical Photography (DHP) upward-looking images were collected annually to capture vegetation and crown cover at Daintree Rainforest SuperSite. These images are used to estimate Leaf Area Index (LAI). </p><p> The site is located in lowland complex mesophyll vine forest near Cape Tribulation. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/daintree-rainforest-supersite/ . </p><p> Other images collected at the site include photopoints, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed under and overstorey cameras and ancilliary images of fauna and flora. </p>

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    Digital Cover Photography (DCP) upward-looking images are collected ideally twice per year (depending upon travel availability) to capture vegetation cover at Alice Mulga SuperSite. These images can be used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI), Crown Cover or Foliage Projective Cover (FPC). The Alice Mulga SuperSite was established in 2010 at Pine Hill Cattle Station with research plots located in low open woodland Mulga (<em>Acacia aneura</em>) and non-Acacia, hummock grassland, and river red gum forest. The core 1 ha plot is located in a dense Mulga woodland (cover 70–80%). For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/alice-mulga-supersite/ . Other images collected at the site include photopoints, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed under and overstorey cameras, panoramic landscape and ancillary images of fauna and flora.

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    <p>Fixed cameras installed at Gingin Banksia Woodland SuperSite provide a time series of fine scale data as a long-term record of vegetation structure and condition. This dense time series of phenocam images provides data for analysis of ecological responses to climate variability, and when consolidated across the entire terrestrial ecosystem research network, supports calibration and validation of satellite-derived remote sensing data, ensuring delivery of higher quality results for broader scale environmental monitoring products. </p> <p> Images have been captured for the understorey continuously since 2012, while images from overstorey positions are available for 2012, 2014, 2015 and 2018-2020. Images are captured at least hourly during daylight hours. New cameras will be operational at the site from the second quarter of 2021. </p> <p> The Gingin Banksia Woodland SuperSite was established in 2011 and is located in a natural woodland of high species diversity with an overstorey dominated by Banksia species. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/gingin-banksia-woodland-supersite/. </p><p> Other images collected at the site include photopoints, digital hemispheric photography (DHP), panoramic landscape and ancillary images of fauna and flora. </p>

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    This service provides access to ecosystem flux data from Whroo in Victoria. The site was classified as box woodland and is located approximately 45km south west of Shepparton.

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    This service provides access to ecosystem flux data from Arcturus monitoring station, near Emerald in Queensland. The site is between lightly forested tussock grasslands and crop lands.

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    <p>Digital Cover Photography (DCP) upward-looking images are collected up to three times per year to capture vegetation cover at Samford Peri-Urban SuperSite. These images can be used to estimate Leaf Area Index (LAI), Crown Cover or Foliage Projective Cover (FPC). </p><p> The Samford Peri-Urban SuperSite was established in 2010 in remnant fringe eucalypt forest, near urban development in the Samford Valley. The upper storey is dominated by <em>Corymbia intermedia</em>, <em>Eucalyptus siderophloia</em> and <em>Lophostemon suaveolens</em>. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/samford-peri-urban-supersite/ . </p><p> Other images collected at the site include photopoints, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed overstorey cameras, panoramic landscape and ancillary images of fauna and flora.</p>

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    This service provides access to ecosystem flux data from Cape Tribulation in Far North Queensland. The site is in lowland tropical rainforest at the Daintree Rainforest Observatory.

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    This service provides access to ecosystem flux data from Gingin in Western Australia. The site is is located in native Banksia woodland on the Swan Coastal Plain about 70km north of Perth.

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    Ecosystem flux data from the Warra Flux Tower, Tasmania.The flux tower is installed in a stand of tall, mixed-aged E. obliqua forest (77 and >250 years-old) with a rainforest understorey and a dense man-fern (Dicksonia antarctica) ground-layer, on a small flat of elevation 100 m adjacent to the Huon River.The climate of Warra is classified as temperate with a mild summer and no dry season. Mean annual precipitation is 1700 mm with a relatively uniform seasonal distribution. Summer temperatures peak in January (min. 8.4°C – max 19.2°C) with winter temperatures reaching their lowest in July (min 2.6°C – max 8.4°C).Eucalyptus obliqua forests dominate the vegetation below 650 m where they exist as fire-maintained communities. On fertile soils these forests attain mature heights in excess of 55m: the tallest E. obliqua within the LTER reaches a height of 90m. The understorey vegetation progresses from wet sclerophyll (dominated by Pomaderris apatala and Acacia dealbata) to rainforest (dominated by Nothofagus cunninghamii, Atherosperma moschatum, Eucryphia lucida and Phyllocladus aspleniifolius) with increasing time intervals between fire events.The site supports prodigous quantities of coarse woody debris as is characteristic of these fire-maintained eucalypt forests on fertile sites in southern Tasmania. The soil at the flux site is derived from Permian mudstone and has a gradational profile with a dark brown organic clayey silt topsoil overlying a yellow brown clay.The instruments are mounted at the top of an 80m tall guyed steel lattice tower. Supplementary measurements above the canopy include temperature, humidity, windspeed, wind direction, rainfall, incoming and reflected shortwave radiation and net radiation. An open-path gas analyser (EC150) was replaced by a closed-path gas analyser (EC155) at the end of Jan 2015.Soil moisture content is measured using Time Domain reflectometry, while soil heat fluxes and temperature are also measured.Micro-meteorology (CO2, H2O, energy fluxes), meteorology (temp, humidity, wind speed and direction, rainfall) taken from the Warra Flux Site from 2013 to late 2016. Data incomplete due to ongoing problems since changing the open-path IRGA to a closed path system (CPEC200) during 2015. Soil data (moisture, heat flux, temp) complete for time period.Data processed to L3 with OzFluxQC version 2.8.4

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    Ecosystem flux data from the Ti Tree East flux station, located on Pine Hill cattle station in the Northern Territory. The site was established in July 2012 and is managed by the University of Technology Sydney.Pine Hill Station is a functioning cattle station that has been in operation for longer than 50 years. However, the east side has not been stocked in over three years. The site is a mosaic of the primary semi-arid biomes of central Australia: grassy mulga woodland and Corymbia/Triodia savanna.The woodland is characterised by a mulga (Acacia aneura) canopy, which is 4.85 m tall on average. The soil is red sand overlying an 8 m deep water table. Elevation of the site is 553 m above sea level, and the terrain is flat.Mean annual precipitation at the nearby (30 km to the south) Bureau of Meteorology station is 305.9 mm but ranges between 100 mm in 2009 to 750 mm in 2010. Predominant wind directions are from the southeast and east.The instrument mast is 10 m tall. Fluxes of heat, water vapour and carbon are measured using the open-path eddy covariance technique at 9.81 m.Supplementary measurements above the canopy include temperature and humidity (9.81 m), windspeed and wind direction (8.28 m), downwelling and upwelling shortwave and longwave radiation (9.9 m).Precipitation is monitored in the savanna (2.5m). Supplementary measurements within and below the canopy include barometric pressure (2 m).Belowground soil measurements are made beneath Triodia, mulga and grassy understorey and include ground heat flux (0.08 m), soil temperature (0.02 m – 0.06 m) and soil moisture (0 – 0.1 m, 0.1 – 0.3 m, 0.6 – 0.8 m and 1.0 – 1.2 m).