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From 1 - 10 / 76
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    This service provides access to ecosystem flux data from the Wombat State Forest in Victoria. The site is a secondary re-growth forest that was last harvested in 1980. Dominant tree species are Eucalyptus obliqua (messmate stringybark), Eucalyptus radiata (narrow leaf peppermint) and Eucalyptus rubida (candlebark) with an average canopy height of 25m.

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    This service provides access to ecosystem flux data from Samford in Queensland. The site is is located on an improved (Paspalum dilatum) pasture in a humid subtropical climatic region experiencing intense urbanisation.

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    This service provides access to ecosystem flux data from Yanco in New South Wales. The site is comprised of sandy loams, scattered clays, red brown earths, transitional red brown earth, sands over clay and deep sands and is located in the western plains of the Murrumbidgee Catchment.

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    This service provides access to ecosystem flux data from Gingin in Western Australia. The site is is located in native Banksia woodland on the Swan Coastal Plain about 70km north of Perth.

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    This service provides access to high-resolution climate change projections for Queensland, Australia based on CMIP5 for RCP8.5 and RCP4.5, downscaled using CCAM.

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    The Fogg Dam flux station was located approximately 6km east of Black Jungle, Northern Territory. It was established in February 2006 and decommissioned in September 2008. It was managed by Monash University and Charles Darwin University.The site was situated within a wetland that flooded seasonally. The principle vegetation was Oryza rufipogon, Pseudoraphis spinescens and Eleocharis dulcis. The elevation was approximately 4m, with a neighbouring Bureau of Meteorology station recording 1411mm mean annual precipitation.Maximum temperatures ranged from 31.3°C (in June and July) to 35.6°C (in October), while minimum temperatures ranged from 14.9°C (in July) to 23.9°C (in December and February). Maximum temperatures varied on a seasonal basis by approximately 4.3°C and minimum temperatures by 9.0°C.The instrument mast was 15m tall. Heat, water vapour and carbon dioxide measurements are taken using the open-path eddy flux technique. Temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind direction, rainfall, incoming and reflected shortwave radiation and net radiation were measured above the canopy. Soil heat fluxes were measured and soil moisture content was gathered using time domain reflectometry.Ancillary measurements taken at the site include LAI, leaf-scale physiological properties (gas exchange, leaf isotope ratios, N and chlorophyll concentrations), vegetation optical properties and soil physical properties. Airborne based remote sensing (Lidar and hyperspectral measurements) was carried out across the transect in September 2008.

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    The Dry River flux station is located approximately 89km south of Katherine, Northern Territory. The site was established in 2008 and is managed by The University of Western Australia and Charles Darwin University.The flux tower site is classified as open forest savanna. The overstory is co-dominated by tree species E. tetrodonta, E. dichromophloia, C. terminalis, Sorghum intrans, S. plumosum, Themeda triandra and Chrysopogon fallax, with canopy height averaging 12.3m.Elevation of the site is close to 175m and mean annual precipitation from a nearby Bureau of Meteorology site measures 895.3mm.Maximum temperatures range from 29.1°C (in June) to 37.6°C (in July), while minimum temperatures range from 14.6°C (in July) to 24.8°C (in November). Maximum temperatures vary seasonally by 8.5°C and minimum by 10.2°C.The instrument mast is 15 meters tall. Heat, water vapour and carbon dioxide measurements are taken using the open-path eddy flux technique. Temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind direction, rainfall, incoming and reflected shortwave radiation and net radiation are measured above the canopy. Soil heat fluxes are measured and soil moisture content is gathered using time domain reflectometry.Ancillary measurements taken at the site include LAI, leaf-scale physiological properties (gas exchange, leaf isotope ratios, N and chlorophyll concentrations), vegetation optical properties and soil physical properties. Airborne based remote sensing (Lidar and hyperspectral measurements) was carried out across the transect in September 2008.

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    The Tumbarumba flux station is located in the Bago State Forest in south eastern New South Wales. It was established in 2000 and is managed by CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research.The forest is classified as wet sclerophyll, the dominant species is Eucalyptus delegatensis, and average tree height is 40m. Elevation of the site is 1200m and mean annual precipitation is 1000mm. The Bago and Maragle State Forests are adjacent to the south west slopes of southern New South Wales and the 48,400 ha of native forest have been managed for wood production for over 100 years.The instrument mast is 70m tall. Fluxes of heat, water vapour and carbon dioxide are measured using the open-path eddy flux technique. Supplementary measurements above the canopy include temperature, humidity, windspeed, wind direction, rainfall, incoming and reflected shortwave radiation and net radiation. Profiles of temperature, humidity and CO2 are measured at seven levels within the canopy. Soil moisture content is measured using Time Domain reflectometry, while soil heat fluxes and temperature are also measured. Hyperspectral radiometric measurements are being used to determine canopy leaf-level properties.The Tumbarumba flux station is supported by TERN and the DCCEE through the ACCSP.

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    Invertebrates dominate the animal world in terms of abundance, diversity and biomass and play critical roles in maintaining ecosystem function. Despite their obvious importance, disproportionate research attention remains focused on vertebrates, with knowledge and understanding of invertebrate ecology still lacking. Due to their inherent advantages, usage of camera traps in ecology has risen dramatically over the last three decades, especially for research on mammals. However, few studies have used cameras to reliably detect fauna such as invertebrates or used cameras to examine specific aspects of invertebrate ecology. Twenty-four Reconyx PC800 HyperfireTM cameras were deployed on 7th July 2016 at Main Camp and left until 12th October 2016 (98 days, or 2352 h of deployment) in the Simpson Desert, south-western Queensland, capturing 372 time-lapse images of Wolf spiders (Family Lycosidae). Images were tagged with camera location, position, angle, camera ID and presence of lycosids. Additionally, spotlight surveys were conducted in October 2016 every hour between dusk (19:30 h) and dawn (05:30 h) over three nights with a total of 352 lycosids observed. This data set was used to determine whether: 1) camera traps provide a viable method for detecting wolf spiders, 2) diel activity patterns of the spiders can be ascertained, and 3) patterns in spider activity vary with environmental conditions, specifically between burned and unburned habitats and the crests and bases of sand dunes. This data presents a useful example of the utility of cameras as a tool for determining the diel activity patterns and habitat use of larger arthropods such as wolf spiders. Please note: Camera trap images are not provided and only species occurrence records are included. Also, image files were renamed after collection, resulting in a number versus time conflict. However, dates and times of sightings provided are correct.

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    The Howard Springs flux station is located in the Black Jungle Conservation Reserve in the Northern Territory south east of Darwin.The flux tower site is classified as an open woodland savanna. The overstory is co-dominated by tree species Eucalyptus miniata and Eucalyptus tentrodonata, and average tree height is 14–16m.Elevation of the site is close to 64m and mean annual precipitation is 1750mm. Maximum temperatures range from 30.4°C (in July) to 33.2°C (in November), while minimum temperatures range from 19.3°C (in July) to 25.4°C (in November). Therefore, the maximum and minimum range varies from 7°C (wet season) to 11°C (dry season).The instrument mast is 23m tall. Heat, water vapour and carbon dioxide measurements are taken using the open-path eddy flux technique. Temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind direction, rainfall, incoming and reflected shortwave radiation and net radiation are measured above the canopy.Soil heat fluxes are measured and soil moisture content is gathered using time domain reflectometry.