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    This dataset consists of counts for multiple plant species obtained from the Ethabuka Station and Carlo Reserve in the Simpson Desert, Australia, from 2004-2013 by the Desert Ecology Research Group (DERG) in conjunction with LTERN. It also consists rainfall data obtained from 2004-2012. These datasets were used to perform a Dynamic Factor Analyses for the manuscript, "Life form explains consistent temporal trends across species: the application of dynamic factor analysis". For more information see: LTERN : http://www.ltern.org.au DERG; http://www.desertecology.edu.au.

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    This dataset consists of counts of plants and seeds for the ephemeral desert herb Trachymene glaucifolia obtained from the Ethabuka and Carlo Reserves in the Simpson Desert, Australia, from 2004-2011 by the Desert Ecology Research Group (DERG) in conjunction with LTERN. It also consists of monthly rainfall data obtained from 1995-2012. Collectively, the dataset was used to construct Multivariate Auto-regressive State-Space (MARSS) models for the manuscript "Reducing common sources of uncertainty in time series population data using MARSS models". For more information see: LTERN : http://www.ltern.org.au DERG : http://www.desertecology.edu.au

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    This dataset contains radio-tracking information on the long-haired rats (Rattus villosissimus). Data was collected between October 2011 and December 2012. It contains the data from enclosure in which a radio-collared rat was released and tracked (Enclosure = 1 or 2), the treatment (Cats = yes or no), the exact date (Date) for when a rat was released with a collar (collared_released), the last time it was recorded (last-time-rec), the time period in months over which the collar frequency was detected (time-collar-detected), the fate of the animal (Fate = unknown, dead or alive), the last location change detected (last_loc_change), based on the latter, the estimated time a rat was assumed alive (estimated_time_alive), the last time a signal was detected from the collar (last_signal detected), the date of the last time an animal was trapped (last_trapped), whether dead remains were found (dead_remains_found = na, yes, or no) and whether the collar was found (collar_found = na, yes, or no).

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    This dataset contains a series of spatial outputs describing probabilistic species predictive occupancy (Species Occupancy Models, or SOM) & habitat suitability (Maximum Entropy, or Maxent) surfaces, the underlying data used to calculate these models & model projections predicting the impact of climate change on flora Maxent surfaces. <br> Model outputs are combination outputs dependent on known species occurrence in the landscape, the species relationship with environmental variables (covariates) such as temperature, rainfall and topography; and its predicted occurrence based on covariate analysis. Maxent models do not predict actual occupancy, but rather habitat suitability, while SOMs predict actual occupancy. confounding factors such as inter-species competition, geographical barriers and disturbance events play a significant role in species occurrence, and are not considered in Maxent or SOM. Flora Maxent climate change projections used NSW and Australian Regional Climate Modelling (NARCliM) variables to predict habitat suitability for a baseline year 2000 and projections for 2030 and 2070. <br> Covariates, Fauna & Flora survey records used to create the models are included. <br> More detailed information regarding each model, its processes and outputs are included in the dataset. <br> A web mapping application on the NSW Spatial Collaboration Portal depicts Maxent & SOM of a selected group of vulnerable Flora & Fauna from this dataset. Access the webapp through the link below: <br> https://portal.spatial.nsw.gov.au/portal/home/item.html?id=78e6ae3d34aa45d2b8118fd0308d6459

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    <p> The dataset aims at studying associations between mating system parameters and fitness in natural populations of trees. Fifty-eight open-pollinated progeny arrays were collected from trees in three populations. Progeny were planted in a reciprocal transplant trial. Fitness was measured by family establishment rates. We genotyped all trees and their progeny at eight microsatellite loci. Planting site had a strong effect on fitness, but seed provenance and seed provenance × planting site did not. Populations had comparable mating system parameters and were generally outcrossed, experienced low biparental inbreeding and high levels of multiple paternity. As predicted, seed families that had more multiple paternities also had higher fitness, and no fitness-inbreeding correlations were detected. Demonstrating that fitness was most affected by multiple paternities rather than inbreeding, we provide evidence supporting the constrained inbreeding hypothesis; i.e. that multiple paternity may impact on fitness over and above that of inbreeding, particularly for preferentially outcrossing trees at life stages beyond seed development. This dataset could potentially be reused for meta-analysis or review of effects of habitat fragmentation on plants (e.g. pollination, mating system, genetic diversity etc). Please contact owner prior to re-use. </p> <p>this is part of the authors' PhD at the University of Adelaide, supervised by Prof Andrew Lowe, Dr Mike Gardner and Dr Kym Ottewell. Main goals of PhD 1. Examine and quantify the impact of fragmentation and tree density on mating patterns, and how this may vary with pollinators of differing mobility 2. Determine the theoretical expectations and perform empirical tests of mating pattern-fitness relationships in trees 3. Explore the plant genetic resource management implications that arise from the observations in aims 1 and 2 </p>

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    Predation by feral cats Felis sylvestris catus is currently one hypothesised cause for the recent dramatic small mammal declines across northern Australia. We conducted a field experiment to measure the effect of predation by for this areas typically low-density cat populations on the demography of a native small mammal which due to the now natural scarce abundance of small mammals in the wild had to be reintroduced. We established two 12.5-ha enclosures in tropical savanna woodland on Wongalara Sanctuary, south of Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory. Each enclosure was divided in half, with cats allowed access to one half but not the other. We introduced about 20 individuals of Rattus villosissimus, a native rodent, into each of the four compartments (two enclosures x two predator-access treatments) and monitored rat demography by mark-recapture analysis and radio-tracking, and predator incursions by camera surveillance and track and scat searches. The data can be used for the mark-recapture analysis. The radio-tracking data and predator incursions data will be uploaded separately. The Cat and Dingoes camera trap dataset was produced using a heat-in-motion cameras (Reconyx PC800 Hyperfire, Holmen, Wisconsin, USA) around the outside of the perimeter fences to detect predators. At least four (but up to six and always the same number of cameras at a time) cameras were placed as one camera installed at each side on the outside of the fences of each enclosure. Cameras were unbaited, to avoid attracting predators. This one file dataset contains the information on the presence/absence data of cats and dingoes on each day. 'Site' indicates the enclosure the camera was attached to ('Enclosure_I' or Enclosure_II'), 'Camera number' indicates which site the camera was on. Note that between October 2011 and April 2012, Enclosure II had two additional cameras (one facing the front gate and one additional monitoring the lower half of the back fence of the enclosure) which resulted in a total of six cameras for during that time. 'Date' indicates the date the photo(s) was/were taken, 'Photos_recorded' whether the camera was operational or photos were retained (e.g. one SD-cards was lost). And columns 'Dingo' and 'Cat' indicate whether these animals were present that day or not (na = no photos recorded, 0 = not present that day, 1 = present that day).

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    The dataset contains a record of coastal dolphin- Australian Snubfin (<em>Orcaella heinsohni</em>) and Indo-Pacific Humpback (<em>Sousa chinensis</em>)) species sighted, total number of individuals, and group/school size in Kakadu National Park rivers between March 2007 to August 2011.

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    The dataset contains distribution data for the Yellow Crazy Ant (Anoplolepis gracilipes) and scale insects (eg Parasaissetia nigra, Dysmicoccus finitimus), collected during the Waypoint Survey component of the Pulu Keeling National Park Island-wide Survey (IWS). The aim of the Waypoint Survey is to monitor densities of the invasive Yellow Crazy Ant (Anoplolepis gracilipes) and to detect establishment of any new scale insect species. The other components of the IWS (Transit Survey and Ink Card and Nocturnal Survey) are recorded in separate submissions.

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    This data set contains the count data of reptiles captured through pitfall and funnel trapping in surveys of grazing agricultural properties in the Central Tablelands of NSW, Australia. Experimental treatments were examined and additional environmental variables were recorded. Each of the 12 sites (farms) was surveyed five times, once between January and March 2014 and four times between October 2014 and March 2015. Each survey consisted of five trap nights. In total 5,040 traps were surveyed giving a combined total of 25,200 trapping nights. 1,242 captures were recorded from 28 species of reptiles. The majority of the species (19) were from the family Scincidae.

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    Leaf traits for 101 populations of <i>Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustissima </i>(Sapindaceae) opportunistically collected across a ~1,000 km latitudinal north-south sequence with climates grading from the arid zone to the mesic Mediterranean zone. Additionally, we present leaf traits for 266 individuals on an attitudinal gradient in the Mt Lofty Ranges, South Australia. Traits measured include leaf area and specific leaf area, as well as climatic variables associated with the collection sites. <p>Leaf area is known to be responsive to climatic conditions. This data could be combined with additional collections for Dodonaea viscosa or broader plant trait data sets to explore pant responses to environmental change.</p>