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    The data set is a statewide annual composite of fire scars (burnt area) derived from all available Landsat 5, 7 and 8 images acquired over the period January to December using time series change detection. Fire scars are automatically detected and mapped using dense time series of Landsat imagery acquired over the period 1987 - present. In addition, from 2013, products have undergone significant quality assessment and manual editing. The automated Landsat fire scar map products covering the period 1987-2012 were validated using a Landsat-derived data set of over 500,000 random points sampling the spatial and temporal variability. On average, over 80% of fire scars captured in Landsat imagery have been correctly mapped with less than 30% false fire rate. These error rates are significantly reduced in the edited 2013-2016 fire scar data sets, although this has not been quantified. <br> For the 2016 annual fire scar composite, the manual editing stage incorporated Landsat and Sentinel 2A imagery (resampled to match Landsat spatial resolution), allowing for increased cloud-free ground observations, and an associated reduction in the number of missed fires (not quantified). Sentinel 2A images were primarily used to map fire scars that were otherwise undetectable in the Landsat sequence due to cloud cover/Landsat revisit time. Additionally, Landsat-7 SLC-Off imagery (affected by striping) was excluded from the 2016 annual composite. It is expected that these modifications should result in improved mapping accuracy for the 2016 period.<br> A new fire scar detection algorithm has been developed, with a new edited product implemented in 2021.

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    Three maps are available: 1) foliage projective cover, 2) forest extent, attributed with the foliage projective cover and 3) accuracy of the extent maps, which also acts as masks of forest and other wooded lands. Each pixel in map 1 estimates the fraction of the ground covered by green foliage. Each pixel in map 2 shows two pieces of information. The first is a classification of whether the vegetation is forest or not. The pixels classified as forest are attributed with the second piece of information: the foliage projective cover. Each pixel in map 3 is a class that provides information on the classification accuracies of the woody extent. These maps are derived from Landsat.

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    The climate adjusted linear seasonal persistent green trend is derived from analysis of the linear seasonal persistent green trend, adjusted for rainfall. The current version is based on the 1987-2014 period. <br> Seasonal persistent green cover is derived from seasonal cover using a weighted smooth spline fitting routine. This weights a smooth line to the minimum values of the seasonal green cover. This smooth minimum is designed to represent the slower changing green component, ideally consisting of perennial vegetation including over-storey, mid-storey and persistent ground cover. The seasonal persistent green is then summarised using simple linear regression, and the slope of the fitted line is captured in the linear seasonal persistent green product. This product is further processed to produce a climate-adjusted version.

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    Two fractional cover decile products, green cover and total cover, are currently produced from the historical timeseries of seasonal fractional cover images. These products compare, at the per-pixel level, the level of cover for the specific season of interest against the long term cover for that same season. For each pixel, all cover values for the relevant seasons within a baseline period (1988 to 2013) are classified into deciles. The cover value for the pixel in the season of interest is then classified according to the decile in which it falls.

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    The physical drivers of ecosystem formation – macroclimate, lithology and landform – along with vegetation structural formations are key determinants of current ecosystem type. Each combination of these ecosystem drivers – each ‘ecological facet’ – provides a unique set of opportunities and challenges for life. <br> Management and conservation should seek to understand and take in to account these drivers of ecosystem formation. By understanding the unique combinations of these drivers management strategies can plan for their full range of variation, and conservation efforts can ensure that unique ecosystems are not lost. Unfortunately, there is currently no Australia-wide standardized map of ecological facets at management-appropriate scales. <br> By understanding the magnitude and distribution of unique combinations of these drivers, management strategies can plan for their full range of variation, and conservation efforts can ensure that unique ecosystems are not lost. Additionally, by improving our understanding of the past and present conditions that have given rise to current ecological facets this dataset could facilitate future predictive environmental modelling. Finally, this data could assisting biodiversity conservation, climate change impact studies and mitigation, ecosystem services assessment, and development planning <br> Further information about the dataset can be found at <a href="https://ternaus.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/TERNSup/pages/2276130817/GEOSS+Ecosystem+Map">GEOSS Ecosystem Map,TERN Knowledge Base </a> .

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    Terrestrial laser scans were acquired in native Eucalypt Open Forest (dry sclerophyll Box-Ironbark forest) in Victoria, Australia. Two plots (RUSH06 and RUSH07) with a 40 m radius were established in Rushworth forest and partially harvested in May 2012 to acquire accurate estimates of above-ground biomass. The main tree species in these plots were Eucalyptus leucoxylon, Eucalyptus microcarpa and Eucalyptus tricarpa. Single trees were extracted from the TLS data and quantitative structure models were used to estimate the tree volume directly from the point cloud data. Above-ground biomass (AGB) was inferred from the derived volumes and basic wood density information, and compared with estimates of above-ground biomass derived from allometric equations and destructive sampling. See <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-210X.12301">Calders et al. (2014)</a> and <a href="http://www.vcccar.org.au/publication/final-report/comprehensive-carbon-assessment-program">Murphy et al. (2014)</a> for further information.

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    The seasonal dynamic reference cover method images are created using a modified version of the dynamic reference cover method developed by <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2012.02.021">Bastin et al (2012) </a>. This approach calculates a minimum ground cover image over all years to identify locations of most persistent ground cover in years with the lowest rainfall, then uses a moving window approach to calculate the difference between the window's central pixel and its surrounding reference pixels. The output is a difference image between the cover amount of a pixel's reference pixels and the actual cover at that pixel for the season being analysed. Negative values indicate pixels which have less cover than the reference pixels. <br/> The main differences between this method and the original method are that this method uses seasonal fractional ground cover rather than the preceding ground cover index (GCI) and this method excludes cleared areas and certain landforms (undulating slopes), which are considered unsuitable for use as reference pixels.

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    <p>Hemispherical photography has been collected across Australia to characterise plant canopy cover and structure, and to study leaf area index. Hemispherical photography is a technique for quantifying plant canopies via photographs captured through a digital camera with hemispherical or fisheye lens. Such photographs can be captured from beneath the canopy, looking upwards, (orientated towards zenith) or above the canopy looking downwards. These measurements have typically been collected in conjunction with the Statewide Landcover and Trees Study (SLATS) star transects field data together with plant canopy analysers such as LAI-2200 and CI-110.</p> <p>Data can be downloaded from https://field.jrsrp.com/ by selecting the combination Field and Hemispheric imagery. Photographs can be accesed through the right-hand side panel, or by finding the file_loc attribute in the csv file. </p>

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    An estimate of persistent green cover per season. This is intended to estimate the portion of vegetation that does not completely senesce within a year, which primarily consists of woody vegetation (trees and shrubs), although there are exceptions where non-woody cover remains green all year round. It is derived by fitting a multi-iteration minimum weighted smoothing spline through the green fraction of the seasonal fractional cover (dp1) time series. A single band image is produced: persistent green vegetation cover (in percent). The no data value is 255.

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    An estimate of persistent green cover per season. This is intended to estimate the portion of vegetation that does not completely senesce within a year, which primarily consists of woody vegetation (trees and shrubs), although there are exceptions where non-woody cover remains green all year round. It is derived by fitting a multi-iteration minimum weighted smoothing spline through the green fraction of the seasonal fractional cover (dim) time series.