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30 meters - < 100 meters

73 record(s)
 
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    This dataset lists land surface substrate characteristics observed in Rangeland sites across Australia by the TERN Surveillance Monitoring team, using standardised AusPlots methodologies. <br /> Land surface substrate observations are collected at each site as part of the AusPlots Point intercept method. At each site, observations on the substrate type (e.g. rock, coarse woody debris, litter) are recorded on transect laid out on the plots. These records form the basis for ground cover derivation, see the AusPlots Ground cover and Point intercept methods below.<br />

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    This product has been superseded and will not be processed from early 2023. Please find the updated version 3 of this product here <a href="https://portal.tern.org.au/metadata/24072">Seasonal dynamic reference cover method - Landsat, JRSRP algorithm version 3.0, Queensland Coverage</a>. The seasonal dynamic reference cover method images are created using a modified version of the dynamic reference cover method developed by <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2012.02.021">Bastin et al (2012)</a>. This approach calculates a minimum ground cover image over all years to identify locations of most persistent ground cover in years with the lowest rainfall, then uses a moving window approach to calculate the difference between the window's central pixel and its surrounding reference pixels. The output is a difference image between the cover amount of a pixel's reference pixels and the actual cover at that pixel for the season being analysed. Negative values indicate pixels which have less cover than the reference pixels. <br> The main differences between this method and the original method are that this method uses seasonal fractional ground cover rather than the preceding ground cover index (GCI) and this method excludes cleared areas and certain landforms (undulating slopes), which are considered unsuitable for use as reference pixels.

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    The climate adjusted linear seasonal persistent green trend is derived from analysis of the linear seasonal persistent green trend, adjusted for rainfall. The current version is based on the 1987-2014 period. <br> Seasonal persistent green cover is derived from seasonal cover using a weighted smooth spline fitting routine. This weights a smooth line to the minimum values of the seasonal green cover. This smooth minimum is designed to represent the slower changing green component, ideally consisting of perennial vegetation including over-storey, mid-storey and persistent ground cover. The seasonal persistent green is then summarised using simple linear regression, and the slope of the fitted line is captured in the linear seasonal persistent green product. This product is further processed to produce a climate-adjusted version.

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    <p>Hemispherical photography has been collected across Australia to characterise plant canopy cover and structure, and to study leaf area index. Hemispherical photography is a technique for quantifying plant canopies via photographs captured through a digital camera with hemispherical or fisheye lens. Such photographs can be captured from beneath the canopy, looking upwards, (orientated towards zenith) or above the canopy looking downwards. These measurements have typically been collected in conjunction with the Statewide Landcover and Trees Study (SLATS) star transects field data together with plant canopy analysers such as LAI-2200 and CI-110.</p> <p>Data can be downloaded from https://field.jrsrp.com/ by selecting the combination Field and Hemispheric imagery. Photographs can be accesed through the right-hand side panel, or by finding the file_loc attribute in the csv file. </p>

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    The soil in terrestrial and blue carbon ecosystems (BCE; mangroves, tidal marshes, seagrasses) is a significant carbon (C) sink. National assessments of C inventories are needed to protect them and aid nature-based strategies to sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide. We harmonised measurements from Australia's terrestrial and BCE and, using consistent multi-scale spatial machine learning, unravelled the drivers of soil organic carbon (SOC) variation and digitally mapped their stocks. The modelling shows that climate and vegetation are continentally the primary drivers of SOC variation. But the underlying regional drivers are ecosystem type, terrain, clay content, mineralogy, and nutrients. The digital soil maps indicate that in the 0-30&nbsp;cm soil layer, terrestrial ecosystems hold 27.6&nbsp;Gt (19.6-39.0&nbsp;Gt), and BCE 0.35&nbsp;Gt (0.20-0.62&nbsp;Gt). Tall open eucalypt and mangrove forests have the largest mean SOC per unit area. Eucalypt woodlands and hummock grassland, which occupy vast areas, store the largest total SOC stock. These ecosystems constitute important regions for conservation, emissions avoidance, and preservation because they also provide additional co-benefits.

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    This data set contains information on Electrical Conductivity and pH from bore water from two plots, Blackbutt and Salmongum the Great Western Woodland Site.

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    The linear seasonal persistent green trend is derived from analysis of the seasonal persistent green product over time. The current version is based on the 1987-2014 period. <br> Seasonal persistent green cover is derived from seasonal fractional cover using a weighted smooth spline fitting routine. This weights a smooth line to the minimum values of the seasonal green cover. This smooth minimum is designed to represent the slower changing green component, ideally consisting of perennial vegetation including over-storey, mid-storey and persistent ground cover. The seasonal persistent green is then summarized using simple linear regression, and the slope of the fitted line is captured in this product. The original units are percentage points per year. Values are later truncated and scaled.

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    The woody vegetation extent for Queensland is attributed with an estimated age in years since the last significant disturbance. The method uses a sequential Conditional Random Fields classifier applied to Landsat time series starting 1988 to predict woody cover over the time period. A set of heuristic rules is used to detect and track regrowing woody vegetation in the time series of woody probabilities and record the approximate start and end dates of the most recent regrowth event. Regrowth detection is combined with the Statewide Land and Trees Study (SLATS) Landsat historic clearing data to provide a preliminary estimate of age since disturbance for each woody pixel in the woody extent. The 'last disturbance' may be due to a clearing event or other disturbance such as fire, flood, drought-related death etc. Note that not all recorded disturbances may result in complete loss of woody vegetation, so the estimated age since disturbance does not always represent the age of the ecosystem. The age since disturbance product is derived from multiple satellite image sources and derived products which represent different scales and resolutions: Landsat (30&nbsp;m), Sentinel-2 (10&nbsp;m) and Earth-i (1&nbsp;m).

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    The physical drivers of ecosystem formation – macroclimate, lithology and landform – along with vegetation structural formations are key determinants of current ecosystem type. Each combination of these ecosystem drivers – each ‘ecological facet’ – provides a unique set of opportunities and challenges for life. <br> Management and conservation should seek to understand and take in to account these drivers of ecosystem formation. By understanding the unique combinations of these drivers management strategies can plan for their full range of variation, and conservation efforts can ensure that unique ecosystems are not lost. Unfortunately, there is currently no Australia-wide standardized map of ecological facets at management-appropriate scales. <br> By understanding the magnitude and distribution of unique combinations of these drivers, management strategies can plan for their full range of variation, and conservation efforts can ensure that unique ecosystems are not lost. Additionally, by improving our understanding of the past and present conditions that have given rise to current ecological facets this dataset could facilitate future predictive environmental modelling. Finally, this data could assisting biodiversity conservation, climate change impact studies and mitigation, ecosystem services assessment, and development planning <br> Further information about the dataset can be found at <a href="https://ternaus.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/TERNSup/pages/2276130817/GEOSS+Ecosystem+Map">GEOSS Ecosystem Map,TERN Knowledge Base </a> .

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    This product has been superseded and will not be processed from early 2023. Please find the updated version 3 of this product at https://portal.tern.org.au/metadata/24070. Two fractional cover decile products, green cover and total cover, are currently produced from the historical timeseries of seasonal fractional cover images. These products compare, at the per-pixel level, the level of cover for the specific season of interest against the long term cover for that same season. For each pixel, all cover values for the relevant seasons within a baseline period (1988 to 2013) are classified into deciles. The cover value for the pixel in the season of interest is then classified according to the decile in which it falls.