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Terrestrial Ecology

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    This dataset lists land surface substrate characteristics observed in Rangeland sites across Australia by the TERN Surveillance Monitoring team, using standardised AusPlots methodologies. <br /> Land surface substrate observations are collected at each site as part of the AusPlots Point intercept method. At each site, observations on the substrate type (e.g. rock, coarse woody debris, litter) are recorded on transect laid out on the plots. These records form the basis for ground cover derivation, see the AusPlots Ground cover and Point intercept methods below.<br />

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    This dataset list soil characteristics observed in Rangeland sites across Australia by the TERN Surveillance Monitoring team, using standardised AusPlots methodologies. <br /> Soil observations are recorded at each site as part of the AusPlots Soil and Landscapes method. Observations on the soil surface conditions are also recorded as part of the AusPlots Plot description method.<br />

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    <p>Digital Hemispherical Photography (DHP) upward-looking images are collected twice per year to capture vegetation and crown cover at the Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite. These images are used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI). The images are captured at the times of estimated maximum and minimum LAI. </p> <p> The Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite was established in 2012 and is located in a stand of tall, mixed-aged <em>Eucalyptus obliqua</em> forest (1.5, 77 and &gt;250 years-old) with a rainforest / wet sclerophyll understorey and a dense man-fern (<em>Dicksonia antarctica</em>) ground-layer. The site experienced a fire in January 2019, which consumed the ground layer and killed a high proportion of the understorey trees but stimulated dense seedling regeneration. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/warra-tall-eucalypt-supersite/. </p><p> Other images collected at the site include photopoints, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed under and overstorey cameras, panoramic landscape and ancillary images of fauna and flora. </p>

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    This dataset consists of images of fauna, flora, fungi or general scenery or events captured at the site on an ad-hoc basis and may provide the researcher with information regarding the species that occupy, frequent or traverse this site.<br /> <br /> The Litchfield Savanna SuperSite was established in 2013 in Litchfield National Park. Site selection was influenced by the history of long-term monitoring work undertaken in this area by the Darwin Centre for Bushfire Research (formerly Bushfires NT). The core 1ha plot is dominated by <em>Eucalyptus miniata</em>. The site is representative of the dominant ecosystem type across northern Australia: frequently burnt tropical savanna in high rainfall areas. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/litchfield-savanna-supersite/ . <br /> Phenocam images and photopoints are also collected at the site.

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    <p>Digital Cover Photography (DCP) upward-looking images are collected up to twice per year to capture vegetation cover at Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite. These images can be used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI), Crown Cover or Foliage Projective Cover (FPC). </p><p> The Tumbarumba Flux site was established in 2000 and started measuring in 2001. The 1 hectare (ha) SuperSite plot was established in 2015. Preliminary images have been captured since 2000 using various sampling strategies and protocols. Since 2015 the 1 ha Supersite has had a consistent DCP protocol implemented twice per year. The overstorey is dominated by <em>Eucalyptus delegatensis</em> and <em>Eucalyptus dalrympleana</em>. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/tumbarumba-wet-eucalypt-supersite/ .</p><p> Other images collected at the site include photopoints, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed under and overstorey cameras, and ancillary images of fauna and flora. </p>

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    Digital Cover Photography (DCP) upward-looking images will be collected up to twice per year to capture vegetation cover at Boyagin Wandoo Woodland SuperSite. These images can be used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI), Crown Cover or Foliage Projective Cover (FPC). The Boyagin Wandoo Woodland SuperSite was established in 2017 in Wandoo Woodland, which is surrounded by broadacre farming. About 80% of the overstorey cover is <em>Eucalyptus accedens</em>. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/boyagin-wandoo-woodland-supersite/ . Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP) has also been collected at Boyagin SuperSite.

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    <p>Digital Hemispherical Photography (DHP) upward-looking images are collected up to twice per year to capture vegetation and crown cover at Wombat Stringybark Eucalypt SuperSite. These images are used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI). The images are captured at the times of estimated maximum and minimum LAI. </p><p> The site was established in 2010 in the Wombat State Forest in Central Victoria. The site is dry eucalypt forest with main species <em>Eucalyptus obliqua</em>, <em>Eucalyptus radiata</em> and <em>Euclayptus rubida</em>. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/wombat-stringybark-eucalypt-supersite/. </p><p> Other images collected at the site include photopoints, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed under and overstorey cameras and ancilliary images of fauna and flora. </p>

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    Invertebrates dominate the animal world in terms of abundance, diversity and biomass and play critical roles in maintaining ecosystem function. Despite their obvious importance, disproportionate research attention remains focused on vertebrates, with knowledge and understanding of invertebrate ecology still lacking. Due to their inherent advantages, usage of camera traps in ecology has risen dramatically over the last three decades, especially for research on mammals. However, few studies have used cameras to reliably detect fauna such as invertebrates or used cameras to examine specific aspects of invertebrate ecology. Twenty-four Reconyx PC800 HyperfireTM cameras were deployed on 7th July 2016 at Main Camp and left until 12th October 2016 (98 days, or 2352 h of deployment) in the Simpson Desert, south-western Queensland, capturing 372 time-lapse images of Wolf spiders (Family Lycosidae). Images were tagged with camera location, position, angle, camera ID and presence of lycosids. Additionally, spotlight surveys were conducted in October 2016 every hour between dusk (19:30 h) and dawn (05:30 h) over three nights with a total of 352 lycosids observed. This data set was used to determine whether: 1) camera traps provide a viable method for detecting wolf spiders, 2) diel activity patterns of the spiders can be ascertained, and 3) patterns in spider activity vary with environmental conditions, specifically between burned and unburned habitats and the crests and bases of sand dunes. This data presents a useful example of the utility of cameras as a tool for determining the diel activity patterns and habitat use of larger arthropods such as wolf spiders. Please note: Camera trap images are not provided and only species occurrence records are included. Also, image files were renamed after collection, resulting in a number versus time conflict. However, dates and times of sightings provided are correct.

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    High quality digital images are captured using a digital SLR camera at the plots (core 1 hectare vegetation plot) at the TERN Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite using the panoramic photopoint method. The panoramic photopoint method may be the most informative in open forests/woodlands and rangelands. Three photopoints are established configured in an equilateral triangle (2.5m sides) with the centre marked with a star dropper and the location recorded with DGPS. At each photopoint take photographic sequences in a 360° panorama, with up to 40 photographs with a minimum 50% overlap between consecutive photographs. For more information about the method, see <a href= 'http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/2.1.4287.3607'>White, el al. (2012) AusPlots Rangelands Survey Protocols Manual Version 1.2.9.</a> <br> The Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite was established in 2012 and is located in a stand of tall, mixed-aged <em>Eucalyptus obliqua</em> forest (1.5, 77 and &gt;250 years-old) with a rainforest / wet sclerophyll understorey and a dense man-fern (<em>Dicksonia antarctica</em>) ground-layer. The site experienced a fire in January 2019, which consumed the ground layer and killed a high proportion of the understorey trees but stimulated dense seedling regeneration. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/warra-tall-eucalypt-supersite/. <br /><br /> Other images collected at the site include digital hemispherical photography, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed under and overstorey cameras, five-photopoint images, and ancillary images of fauna and flora.

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    This dataset includes volumetric soil water content measured across soil pits in the lowland rainforest of Cape Tribulation. Data were acquired using time-domain reflectometry (TDR) probes recording at soil surface (10 cm) and at depths (50, 100 and 150 cm) at 4 control points - PB1 and PB8 are in the SW quadrant of the crane plot, PB2 and PB5 are in the NW quadrant of the crane plot.