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Micromoles per mole

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    <br>This release consists of flux tower measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer using eddy covariance techniques. Data were processed using PyFluxPro (v3.4.7) as described by Isaac et al. (2017). PyFluxPro produces a final, gap-filled product with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) partitioned into Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER).</br><br> Fletcherview Tropical Rangeland SuperSite was established in 2021 at James Cook University’s Fletcherview Research Station, a fully operational outback cattle station located 50&nbsp;km west of Townsville, Queensland. The site is used for cattle grazing and is characterised by tall open savanna. The vegetation is dominated by native grasses such as blackspear and kangaroo grasses, as well as introduced species like buffel grass, signal grass and leucaena. Fletcherview typically experiences a dry and wet season, with most rainfall occurring between January and April.<br />

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    This dataset consists of measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer at Fletcherview Research Station in Queensland using eddy covariance techniques.<br /> Fletcherview Tropical Rangeland SuperSite was established in 2021 at James Cook University’s Fletcherview Research Station, a fully operational outback cattle station located 50 km west of Townsville, Queensland. The site is used for cattle grazing and is characterised by tall open savanna. The vegetation is dominated by native grasses such as blackspear and kangaroo grasses, as well as introduced species like buffel grass, signal grass and leucaena. Fletcherview typically experiences a dry and wet season, with most rainfall occurring between January and April. <br />For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/fletcherview-tropical-rangeland-supersite/. <br />This data is also available at http://data.ozflux.org.au .<br />

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    <br>This release consists of flux tower measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer using eddy covariance techniques. Data were processed using PyFluxPro (v3.4.7) as described by Isaac et al. (2017). PyFluxPro produces a final, gap-filled product with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) partitioned into Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER).</br> <br>Samford flux station is situated on an improved (<em>Paspalum dilatum</em>) pasture in the humid subtropical climatic region of coastal south-east Queensland. Located only 20&nbsp;km from the centre of Brisbane city, Samford Valley provides an ideal case study to examine the impact of urbanisation and land use change on ecosystem processes. The valley covers an area of some 82&nbsp;km<sup>2</sup> and is drained in the southern regions by the Samford creek, which extends some 13&nbsp;km to Samford Village and into the South Pine River. The Samford Valley is historically a rural area experiencing intense urbanisation, with the population increasing almost 50% in the 10 years to 2006 (Morton Bay Regional Council, 2011). Within the Samford valley study region, the Samford Ecological Research Facility (SERF) not only represents a microcosm of current and historical land uses in the valley, but provides a unique opportunity to intensively study various aspects of ecosystem health in a secure, integrated and long term research capacity. Mean annual minimum and maximum temperatures at a nearby Bureau of Meteorology site are 13.1&nbsp;°C and 25.6&nbsp;°C respectively while average rainfall is 1102&nbsp;mm.</br>

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    <br>This release consists of flux tower measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer using eddy covariance techniques. Data were processed using PyFluxPro (v3.4.7) as described by Isaac et al. (2017). PyFluxPro produces a final, gap-filled product with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) partitioned into Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER).</br> <br>The forest is classed as a tall, wet sclerophyll forest, and the dominant <em>Eucalyptus Regnans</em> or mountain ash trees have an average canopy height of 75&nbsp;m. The site contains a chronosequence of (20, 80 and 300) stand ages that were established during fires occurring over the last 300 years. The area is assigned the IUCN Category II (National Parks) of the United Nations’ list of National Parks and protected areas, which means the park is primarily managed for ecosystem conservation. The catchment area is dominated by mountain ash, the world’s tallest flowering plant (angiosperm). Trees can reach heights of more than 90&nbsp;m in areas with high rainfall and fertile soil. Mountain ash forests are confined to the cool mountain regions with elevations ranging from 460 to 1100&nbsp;m and average rainfalls of 1100 to 2000&nbsp;mm/y. These trees are well distributed throughout Victoria’s Central Highlands including the Otway Ranges and Strzlecki Ranges; they are also found in Tasmania. The catchment area contains a portion of the Mt. Disappointment range, the Divide and the headwaters of Wallaby Creek and Silver Creek, and much of the slopes are characterised as flat to moderate.</br> <br>The station itself is located within an old growth stand with individual trees as old as 300 years. Below the dominant canopy lies a temperate rainforest understorey consisting of <em>Pomaderris aspera</em> and <em>Olearia argophylla</em> species, which are 10 to 18&nbsp;m tall. The lower layers of vegetation are dominated by tree ferns (<em>Cyathea australis</em> and <em>Dicksonia antartica</em>) and extensive tracts of rosette and rhizonic ferns (<em>Polystichum proliferum</em> and <em>Blechnum wattsii</em>) as well as acacia trees. The elevation is approximately 720&nbsp;m. The major soil type within the forest is krasnozemic soils, which are friable red/brown soils, with high amounts of organic matter in the upper 20 to 30&nbsp;cm. However, the composition of krasnozemic soils is not homogenous, but rather varies with altitude. Grey-yellow podsolised soils can be found at lower altitudes, while krasnozemic loams is characteristic of the higher altitudes of the Kinglake and of the Hume Plateau. The clay content of these soils increases with depth until at least 200&nbsp;cm deep, where after a transition soils contain rock fragments. The climate of the study area is classified as a cool, temperate zone, with the highest temperatures occurring during the summer months of December – February (13.8 to 22.5&nbsp;°C), whilst the coolest temperatures are experienced in May and August (4.7 to 9.2&nbsp;°C). Average annual precipitation is 1209&nbsp;mm, with a maximum rainfall occurring in June (Ashton, 2000). The study site experiences foggy conditions after sunset during autumn and winter.</br> <br>The original station had a main mast at 110&nbsp;m. This station was destroyed in February 2009 by bushfires. A replacement station was established in March 2010 and started recording in May 2010. The mast sat at a height of 5&nbsp;m. The post-fire instrumentation was not as diverse as the pre-fire instrumentation.</br>

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    This dataset contains leaf functional trait measurements describing leaf structure, chemistry and metabolism collected from the Cumberland Plain site in 2014.

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    This dataset contains leaf functional trait measurements describing leaf structure, chemistry and metabolism collected from the Alice Mulga site in 2014

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    This dataset contains leaf functional trait measurements describing leaf structure, chemistry and metabolism collected from the Calperum Mallee site, in 2013.

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    This dataset contains leaf functional trait measurements describing leaf structure, chemistry and metabolism collected from the Warra Tall Eucalypt site, in summer 2012 and winter 2013.

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    This dataset contains leaf functional trait measurements describing leaf structure, chemistry and metabolism collected from the Great Western Woodlands site in 2013.

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    This dataset contains leaf functional trait measurements describing leaf structure, chemistry and metabolism collected from the Daintree Rainforest, Cape Tribulation site, in the dry season 2012 and wet season 2014.