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ANIMAL ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR

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    High quality passive infrared wildlife cameras were used to acquire information on faunal biodiversity at the Robson Creek site. Two camera traps were deployed at the site between 17-03-2018 and 25-07-2018. The first camera located in proximity to the acoustic sensor SM2/SM4 which is around 100m from the flux tower and at a height of 1.5 meter above ground, on a star picket. The second camera located for a short while near the tower (10 meter) and was attached on a bungy cord tied to a tree, at a height of 0.3 meter above ground.<br><br> The Robson Creek site lies on the Atherton Tablelands in the wet tropical rain forests of Australia at 680-740 m elevation. It is situated in Danbulla National Park within the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. The Wet Tropics Bioregion of Australia is situated on the north-eastern coast of Queensland, between Cooktown to the north and Townsville to the south. Approximately 40% (7200 km2) of the region is covered by rain forest. Features of the region include very high plant and animal endemism, characteristics of both Gondwanan and Indo-Malaysian forests, and frequent cyclonic disturbance. The site includes core 1 ha plot (100 m x 100 m) which is located within the fetch of the flux tower and is the focal site of recurrent monitoring, and 25 ha vegetation survey plot. The vegetation survey plot has been set up for inclusion in the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute’s Center for Tropical Forest Science – Forest Global Earth Observatory (CTFS-ForestGEO) global network of forest research plots. <br><br> For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/robson-creek-rainforest-supersite/ . <br /><br /> Other images collected at the site include time-lapse images taken from 3 phenocams (above canopy). <br /><br /> <iframe allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" src="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WW-cpPMhMz4" title="TERN Robson Creek SuperSite Wildlife 2017" style="height:248px;width:462px;"></iframe> <br />Camera trap results for the TERN FNQ Rainforest SuperSite - Robson Creek, Jan - Feb 2017.

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    High quality passive infrared wildlife cameras were used to acquire information on faunal biodiversity at the site. Two cameras were deployed from July to Dec 2018 and between March and May 2019. <br /><br /> The Gingin Banksia Woodland SuperSite was established in 2011 and is located in a natural woodland of high species diversity with an overstorey dominated by Banksia species. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/gingin-banksia-woodland-supersite/. <br /> Other images collected at the site include digital cover photography, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed under and overstorey cameras and ancillary images of flora.

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    This dataset contains the number (count) of dingo, red fox and feral cat photographs from remote camera traps in the Simpson Desert. Note, spatial location for the sites has been desensitized. Please contact the data author for site details.

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    The dataset includes three csv files: [1] effects of pre-inhabitation and viruses on the feeding behavior of <i>Rhopalosiphum padi</i> and <i>R. maidis</i> (min). [2] Effects of pre-inhabitation and viruses on the fecundity of<i> R. padi</i> and <i>R. maidis</i> (total offspring in laboratory and field). [3] Effect of pre-inhabitation and viruses on the host plant nutrient content (amino acids, total sterols, and simple sugars-mg/g). These data might be used by researchers studying positive interactions, effects of viruses on host plants and vectors, phytochemistry of the wheat plant, and feeding behavior of phloem-feeders.

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files for TERN Boyagin Wandoo Woodland SuperSite. Long-term recordings of the environment can be used to identify sound sources of interest, characterise the soundscape, aid in the assessment of fauna biodiversity, monitor temporal trends and track environmental changes.</p> <p>The site was established in 2017 at the Boyagin Nature Reserve with research plots located in Wandoo woodland (<em>Eucalypt sp.</em>). The core 1&nbsp;ha plot is located in a dense eucalypt woodland. For additional site information, see <a href="https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/boyagin-wandoo-woodland-supersite/">Boyagin Wandoo Woodland SuperSite</a></p> <p>In 2018 an acoustic recorder was set up to collect audio data for a total of 12 hours per day, split between six hours around dawn and six hours around dusk. The recording schedule aimed at capturing morning and evening bird choruses while minimizing memory and battery requirements. A long-term spectrogram has been generated for each audio file to aid in data exploration.</p> <p>Data are made available through the data link. For downloading large amount of data, please follow these instructions <a href="https://ternaus.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/TERNSup/pages/2530148353/How+to+download+TERN+s+acoustic+data+in+bulk">How to download TERN's acoustic data in bulk</a></p>

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    The Daintree Rainforest SuperSite comprises two sites (a) the Daintree Rainforest Observatory at Cape Tribulation, comprising a long-term monitoring sites, canopy crane, and extensive researcher and teaching infrastructure and (b) research facilities at the Daintree Discovery Centre at Cow Bay, an award winning ecotourism interpretive centre featuring a canopy tower, aerial walkway and scientific monitoring. This dataset contains high quality passive infrared wildlife cameras were used to acquire information on faunal biodiversity at the Daintree Discovery Centre at Cow Bay. One camera trap was deployed adjacent to the 1 ha core plot between 22/01/2017 and 08/06/2017. The core plot is located within the fetch of the flux tower and is the focal site of recurrent monitoring. The camera (Reconyx HC600 HyperFire) was attached to a tree at 0.5 metre high. <br> The forest is classed as complex mesophyll vine forest (type 1a) and has an average canopy height of 25m. The dominant canopy trees belong to the Arecaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Rutaceae, Meliaceae, Myristicaceae and Icacinaceae families. It is continuous for several kilometres around the Cow Bay Tower except for an area 600m north-east of the flux tower, which is cleared agricultural land used for a cattle farm. For additional information on the Daintree Rainforest SuperSite, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/daintree-rainforest-supersite/ <br /><br /> Other images collected at the site include digital cover photography, phenocam time-lapse images (3 above canopy, 1 under canopy), panoramic landscape and photopoints. <br /><br /> <iframe frameborder="0" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7VkIFIWfrkQ" title="Camera trap results for the Daintree Discovery Centre between January and April 2017" style="height:248px;width:462px;"></iframe> <br />Camera trap results for the Daintree Discovery Centre between January and April 2017.

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    This dataset includes upper and lower thermal limits, voluntary exposure to extreme cold and warm temperatures, ATP levels, and longevity of <i>Acyrtociphom pisum</i> and <i>Hippodamia convergens</i>. Pathogens can modify many aspects of host behavior or physiology, with cascading impacts across trophic levels in terrestrial food webs. These changes include thermal tolerance of hosts, however, the effects of fungal infections on thermal tolerances and behavioral responses to extreme temperatures of prey (<i>Acyrtociphon pisum</i>) and predator (<i>Hippodamia convergens</i>) insect species have rarely been studied. We measured the impacts of fungal infection (at two levels: low and high spore load) on thermal tolerance (critical thermal maximum and minimum), voluntary exposure, energetic cost, and survival of both insect species. Fungal infection reduced thermal tolerance to heat in both insect species, but only reduced tolerance to cold of the predator. Voluntary exposure to extreme temperatures was modified by the infection, energetic cost increased with infection and thermal conditions, and survival was significantly reduced in both insect species.

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    The project is focused on the topic, 'enhanced heat tolerance of virus-infected aphids lead to niche expansion and reduced interspecific competition. The two aphid species studied are <i>Rhopalosiphum padi</i> and <i>Rhopalosiphum maidis</i>. The project had some of the following objectives: [1] Spatial distribution of two aphid species on the host plants [2] Upper thermal limits of two aphid species. [3] Effects of the viral infection on the host plant thermal profile. [4] Levels of expression of heat shock protein genes of virus-free and viruliferous aphids. [5] Locomotor capacity of aphids, effects of viruses on the locomotor capacity. [6] Effects of viral infection, temperature, and competition on the lifespan and fecundity of <i>R. padi</i> [7] Effects of viral infection, temperature, and competition on the lifespan and fecundity of <i>R. maidis</i> [8] Temperature of acrylic tubes used on aphid experiments. [9] Thermal lethal dose 50 of virus-free and viruliferous aphids [10] Thermal preference of virus-free and viruliferous aphids. This information can be very useful for ecologist working on insect population dynamics as well as physiologist and eco-physiologists doing meta-analyses of expression of heat shock protein genes induced by symbionts.

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    The lesser hairy-footed dunnart (<i>Sminthopsis youngsoni, Dasyuridae</i>) is a generalist marsupial insectivore in arid Australia, but consumes wolf spiders (<i>Lycosa spp., Lycosidae</i>) disproportionately often relative to their availability. This project tested the hypothesis that this disproportionate predation is a product of frequent encounter rates between the interactants due to high overlap in their diets and use of space and time. This data set focuses on overlap in the diel acttivity patterns wolf spiders (<i>Lycosa spp.</i>) and the lesser hairy-footed dunnart (<i>Sminthopsis youngsoni</i>) in the Simpson Desert, south-western Queensland Australia. To quantify the temporal activity of lycosids, spotlight surveys were conducted in October 2016 every hour between dusk (19:30 h) and dawn (05:30 h) over three nights. Additionally, remote camera traps were deployed to further quantify patterns in the activity of lycosids and S. youngsoni. Twenty-four Reconyx PC800 HyperfireTM cameras were deployed on 7th July 2016 at Main Camp and left until 12th October 2016 (98 days, or 2352 h of deployment). Images were tagged with camera location, position, angle, camera ID number, species and confidence and date and time data were extracted from each image. This data was used to identify mean activity times for each species (with confidence intervals) and to assess overlap in nocturnal activity patterns between lycosids and S. youngsoni, and thus the potential for competition and predation using the Overlap v 0.2.7 package in R. This data presents a useful example for investigating how the 'Overlap' package works and the benefits it provides.

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files for TERN Whroo Dry Eucalypt SuperSite. Long-term recordings of the environment can be used to identify sound sources of interest, characterise the soundscape, aid in the assessment of fauna biodiversity, monitor temporal trends and track environmental changes.</p> <p>The site was established in 2011 in box woodland dominated by <em>Eucalyptus microcarpa</em> (grey box) and <em>Eucalyptus leucoxylon</em> (yellow gum). Smaller numbers of <em>Eucalyptus sideroxylon</em> (ironbark) and <em>Acacia pycnantha</em> (golden wattle) are also found on site. Elevation of the site is close to 165 m and mean annual precipitation from a nearby Bureau of Meteorology site measure 558 mm. Maximum temperatures range from 29.8°C (in January) to 12.6°C (in July), while minimum temperatures range from 14.2°C (in February) to 3.2°C (in July). Maximum temperatures vary on a seasonal basis by approximately 17.2°C and minimum temperatures by 11.0°C. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/whroo-dry-eucalypt-supersite/.</p> <p>In 2012 an acoustic recorder was set up to collect audio data for a total of 12 hours per day, split between six hours around dawn and six hours around dusk. The recording schedule aimed at capturing morning and evening bird choruses while minimizing memory and battery requirements. A long-term spectrogram has been generated for each audio file to aid in data exploration. The sensor also recorded temperature, minimum- maximum- and mean-sound pressure levels.</p> <p>Data are made available through the data link. For downloading large amount of data, please follow these instructions <a href="https://ternaus.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/TERNSup/pages/2530148353/How+to+download+TERN+s+acoustic+data+in+bulk">How to download TERN's acoustic data in bulk</a></p>