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    This data contains relative species cover of vascular plants in plots of either mature tall, wet eucalypt forest or of 25-50 year-old silvicultural regeneration following clearfell harvesting in the Warra Tall Eucalypt site between 2010 - 2011

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    We selected nine study sites, each incorporating three vegetation states: (a) fallow cropland, representing the restoration starting point, (b) planted old field (actively restored site), and (c) reference York gum (E. loxophleba) woodland. Plant species richness and cover All annual and perennial plant species were recorded in spring 2017 within each plot and identified to genus and species level where possible. Nomenclatures follow the Western Australian Herbarium (2017). A point intercept method previously demonstrated to provide objective and repeatable measures of cover (Godínez-Alvarez, Herrick, Mattocks, Toledo & Van Zee 2009; Prober, Standish & Wiehl 2011) was used to quantify cover of individual plant species, total vegetation cover and substrate types (i.e., bare ground, litter cover, plant cover). Ground cover, individual species, and canopy cover intercepting at every 2 m along four parallel, evenly spaced 50 m transects across each plot were recorded using a vertically placed dowel (8 mm wide, 2 m tall), resulting in 100 intercepting points per plot. For planted old fields, transects were placed parallel to planting rows, with two centred on rows and two centred between rows. This approximately represented the relative abundance of planted rows and non-planted inter-rows. If a species was recorded in the plot but did not intercept the dowel on any transect it was assigned 0.5 points. This method provided a measure of relative abundance (percentage cover) of plant species across the plot. To calculate species richness and cover across different life history and growth forms, species were classified into the following groups: total, native trees, native shrubs, native non – planted shrubs, native grasses, native perennial forbs, native annual forbs, exotic grasses and exotic annual forbs using the Western Australian Herbarium (2017) classification. Woody debris and leaf litter surveys Leaf-litter dry mass was estimated by collecting leaf-litter from five randomly placed 25 cm x 25 cm quadrats along two 50 m transects across each plot. Litter was stored in paper bags for transportation and then oven dried for 36 hours at 60 °C. The dried litter was weighed to 3 decimal points. Cover of fine and coarse woody debris and litter depth was estimated at every meter along two 20 m transects for each plot. Woody debris was classified by diameter. Length, max and min diameter was measured for all logs with a diameter greater than 10 cm.

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    The lesser hairy­footed dunnart (<i>Sminthopsis youngsoni, Dasyuridae</i>) is a generalist marsupial insectivore in arid Australia, but consumes wolf spiders (<i>Lycosa spp., Lycosidae</i>) disproportionately often relative to their availability. This project tested the hypothesis that this disproportionate predation is a product of frequent encounter rates between the interactants due to high overlap in their diets and use of space and time. This data set focuses on overlap in the use of different microhabitats of wolf spiders (<i>Lycosa spp.</i>) and the lesser hairy­footed dunnart (<i>Sminthopsis youngsoni</i>) in the Simpson Desert, south­western Queensland Australia. Microhabitat use was determined by estimating the percentage cover of seven microhabitat variables and distance to nearest cover along trails left by individuals of each species­ group and a randomly orientated (control) trail for each actual trail as a measure of the availability of each microhabitat within the local environment. Trail length was also recorded and data was collected across 16 trapping grids at Main Camp during July and October (winter and Spring) in 2017. Differences in microhabitat use between trail types (actual vs control) and species (lycosids vs dunnarts) were assessed using non­metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) and permutational analyses of variance (PERMANOVA). These analyses were performed using this data.

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    Gentry transects were established to monitor the vegetation abundance, cover and structure of the mid-stratum and subordinate stratum of the core 1 ha plot in the Warra Tall Eucalypt site in 2014.

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    Gentry transects were established to monitor the vegetation abundance, cover and structure of the mid-stratum and subordinate stratum of the core 1 ha plot in the Robson Creek Raibnforest site in 2012.

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    Gentry transects were established to monitor the vegetation abundance, cover and structure of the mid-stratum and subordinate stratum of the core 1 ha plot in the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt site in 2015.

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    Gentry transects and quadrats were established to monitor the vegetation abundance, cover and structure of the mid-stratum and subordinate stratum of the core 1 ha plot in the Cumberland Plain site in 2014.

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    The dataset comprises vegetation cover and shrub occurrence along a point intercept survey in two 1 ha plots at the Great Western Woodlands site between 2013 - 2015

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    Gentry transects were established to monitor the vegetation abundance, cover and structure of the mid-stratum and subordinate stratum of the core 1 ha plot in the Samford Peri-Urban site in 2012 and 2017.

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    The data set contains information on plant diversity indices, species composition, vegetation cover and edaphic properties from the <i>Eucalyptus salubris</i> woodlands, Great Western Woodlands site. The data represents changes in plant diversity due to disturbance with time since fire in a chronosequence.