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TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS

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    The record contains information on beetle succession in decaying <i>Eucalyptus obliqua</i> logs, from 1999-2009. Data on beetle species identification, field sampling notes, and collection details from eucalyptus logs across the decade range from 1999 - 2009 are provided.

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    The data set contains information on the soil water content at various depths in the Samford Ecological Research Facility (SERF), Samford Peri-Urban Site. Information on soil water content is provided from two sensors, i.e., 1) Sentek Solo, for high frequency sampling and 2) Sentek Diviner, for coarser resolution sampling.

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    The dataset contains records of Robber Crab (<i>Birgus latro</i>) mortality across Christmas Island, including location co-ordinates and details of sex and thoracic length. To manage the impact of road mortality on the species, this monitoring project is designed to assess spatial variation in road mortality. Basic data are collected at the site (sex, size, date, coordinates).

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    This data contains vegetation cover, ground cover, tree density and stand basal area data across a multi-century time-since-fire sequence derived from growth ring-size relationships in fire-sensitive <em>Eucalyptus salubris</em> woodlands.

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    The record contains information on litterfall data from four 1-hectare plots from the Great Western Woodlands site collected in 2014. Data on total litter weights from fifteen litter traps in each of four 1-ha study plots and crown canopy cover percent is provided.

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    The dataset contains biological data collected 2005, 2012 as part of the Tanami Regional Biodiversity Monitoring (Tanami RBM) program. The Tanami RBM program uses 89 sites across the Tanami region, central-west Northern Territory. At these sites, flora and fauna are surveyed during the late-dry (usually November-December) or late-wet (usually February-March) seasons. Each site comprises a 200 m x 300 m survey plot from which the data are recorded using various survey methods: site descriptions, vegetation transects, bird surveys, small vertebrate trapping, and tracking surveys. This dataset contains the data from eight surveys undertaken between 2005 and 2012: six in the late-dry and two in the late-wet seasons. The precision of site locations has been reduced to 0.1 decimal degree, which is approximately 10 km at the study region. This denaturing is because some sites contain threatened and/or sensitive species that might be at risk from collection or disturbance. The dataset contains species information from vegetation surveys and fauna species captures and observations. The data can be used to: [1] Review the outcomes of the survey methodologies [2] Presence data of the species recorded [3] Impacts of mining on the region's flora and fauna e.g. what is the spatial and temporal impact of mining activities on biota? [4] Conservation and biodiversity e.g. what are the spatial and temporal trends in the occurrence of key/threatened species? How do land units/systems change over time?

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    These datasets provide the data underlying the publication on <i>"Lines in the sand: quantifying the cumulative development footprint in the world’s largest remaining temperate woodland"</i> <em> https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10980-017-0558-z. </em>. The datasets are: (A) data in csv format: [1] development footprint by sample area: Information on the 24, ~490 km^2 sample areas assessed in the study, including the different infrastructure types (roads, railways, mapped tracks, un-mapped tracks which have been manually digitized in the study using aerial imagery and hub infrastructure such as mine pits and waste rock dumps, also manually digitized in the study). Also contains some key co-variables assessed as potential explanatory variables for development footprint. The region-wide modelling of development footprint found strong positive effects of mining project density and pastoralism, as well as a highly significant negative interaction between the two. At low mining project densities, development footprints are more extensive in pastoral areas, but at high mining project densities, pastoral areas are relatively less developed than non-pastoral areas, on average. [2] Great Western Woodlands (GWW) 20 km grid: The datasets provides data for the 20x20 km grid placed over the whole GWW and used for the regional estimation of development footprint, linear infrastructure density, and linear infrastructure type based on the region-wide analysis. Data is for each cell in the grid and provides the total length of roads in that grid cell, MINEDEX mining projects, pastoral status, etc. This dateset was used to project the data from the 24 study areas across the whole of the Great Western Woodlands and calculate region-wide estimates of development footprint and linear infrastructure lengths. [3] disturbance by patch: This dataset provides the data for each patch for the analysis of patch-level drivers of development footprint, which was performed to gain further insights into the effects of other landscape variables that what could be gleaned from the region-wide analysis. For this analysis, we divided sample areas into polygonal patch types, each with a unique combination of the following categorical co-variables: pastoral tenure, greenstone lithology, conservation tenure, ironstone formation, schedule-1 area clearing restrictions, environmentally sensitive area designation, vegetation formation, and sample area. For each patch type (n=261), we calculated the following attributes: a) number of mining projects, b) number of dead mineral tenements, c) sum of duration of all live and dead tenements, d) type of tenements (exploration/prospecting tenement, mining and related activities tenement, none), e) primary target commodity (gold, nickel, iron-ore, other), f) distance to wheatbelt, and g) distance to the nearest town. [4] mapped versus digitized tracks: This dataset provides mapped and un-mapped track widths, measured using high-resolution aerial imagery at at least 20 randomly-generated locations within each of 24 sample areas. Pastoral tenure and mining intensity for each sample area are included for analysis purposes. [5] edge effect scenarios: Hypothetical edge effect zones were created, based on effect zones gleaned from the literature and arranged under three scenarios, to reflect potential risks of offsite impacts in areas adjacent to development footprints observed (see appendix 3 of article). The calculated proportion of the entire GWW within edge effect zones varied from ~3% under the conservative scenario to ~35% under the maximal scenario. Within the range of development footprints observed in this study, the proportion of a landscape that lies within edge effect zones increases hyperbolically with the number of mining projects, and approaches 100% in the maximal scenario, 60% in the moderate scenario, and ~20% under the conservative scenario. shapefiles: [6] Great Western Woodlands boundary, [7] sample areas (layer file shows sample areas by category).

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    This dataset contains the effect of stress and herbivory on the establishment of alternate provenances of a foundation tree species. This data relates to plant fitness and could be used for more broader studies in this area. We established a common garden experiment within a 238 ha restoration site owned and managed by the South Australian Water Corporation (SA Water), near the township of Clarendon (-35.0882°S, 138.6236°E). We grew ca.1500 seedlings sourced from one local and two non-local provenances of <i>Eucalyptus leucoxylon</i> to test whether local provenancing was appropriate. The three provenances spanned an aridity gradient, with the local provenance sourced from the most mesic area and the distant provenance sourced from the most arid. We explored the effect of provenance on four fitness proxies after 15 months, including survival, above-ground height, susceptibility to insect herbivory, and pathogen related stress.

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    This data contains the visual assessment of fuel layers in fire-sensitive <em>Eucalyptus salubris</em> woodlands using Vesta methods across 24 sites in a multi-century (10 to 260+ years since fire) time-since-fire sequence derived from growth ring-size relationships.

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    The lesser hairy­footed dunnart (<i>Sminthopsis youngsoni, Dasyuridae</i>) is a generalist marsupial insectivore in arid Australia, but consumes wolf spiders (<i>Lycosa spp., Lycosidae</i>) disproportionately often relative to their availability. This project tested the hypothesis that this disproportionate predation is a product of frequent encounter rates between the interactants due to high overlap in their diets and use of space and time. This data set focuses on overlap in the use of different microhabitats of wolf spiders (<i>Lycosa spp.</i>) and the lesser hairy­footed dunnart (<i>Sminthopsis youngsoni</i>) in the Simpson Desert, south­western Queensland Australia. Microhabitat use was determined by estimating the percentage cover of seven microhabitat variables and distance to nearest cover along trails left by individuals of each species­ group and a randomly orientated (control) trail for each actual trail as a measure of the availability of each microhabitat within the local environment. Trail length was also recorded and data was collected across 16 trapping grids at Main Camp during July and October (winter and Spring) in 2017. Differences in microhabitat use between trail types (actual vs control) and species (lycosids vs dunnarts) were assessed using non­metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) and permutational analyses of variance (PERMANOVA). These analyses were performed using this data.