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    This is a spatial dataset comprising predictions of vegetation condition for biodiversity for the brigalow belt bioregion. The dataset was created using a gradient boosting decision tree (GBDT) model based on eight vegetation specific remote sensing (RS) datasets and 17,000 training sites of known vegetation community and condition state. Condition score was modelled as a function of the difference in the RS space within homogeneous vegetation communities. The product is intended to represent predicted BioCondition for year 2019 rather than any single date.

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    This dataset indicates the presence and persistence of water across Queensland between 1988 and 2022. Water is one of the world’s most important resources as it’s critical for human consumption, agriculture, the persistence of flora and fauna species and other ecosystem services. Information about the spatial distribution and prevalence of water is necessary for a range of business, modelling, monitoring, risk assessment, and conservation activities. The water count product is based on water index and water masks for Queensland (Danaher & Collett 2006) and represents the proportion of observations with water present across the Landsat time series as a fraction of total number of possible observations for the period 1 Jan 1988 to 31 Dec 2022. The product has two bands where band 1 is the number of times water was present across the time series, and band 2 is the count of unobscured (i.e. non-null) input pixels, or number of total observations for that pixel. Cloud, cloud-shadow, steep slopes and topographic shadow can obscure the ability to count water presence.

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    Vertical plant profiles for the Australian continent were derived through integration of ICESat GLAS waveforms with ALOS PALSAR and Landsat data products. Co-registered Landsat Foliage Projected Cover (FPC) and ALOS PALSAR L-band HH and HV mosaics were segmented to generate objects with similar radar backscatter and cover characteristics. Within these, height, cover, age class and L-band backscatter characteristics were summarised based on the ICESat and Landsat time-series and ALOS PALSAR datasets.

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    Two fractional cover decile products, green cover and total cover, are currently produced from the historical timeseries of seasonal fractional cover images. These products compare, at the per-pixel level, the level of cover for the specific season of interest against the long term cover for that same season. For each pixel, all cover values for the relevant seasons within a baseline period (1988-2013) are classified into deciles. The cover value for the pixel in the season of interest is then classified according to the decile in which it falls. This product is based upon the JRSRP Fractional Cover 3.0 algorithm.

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    The linear seasonal persistent green trend is derived from analysis of the seasonal persistent green product over time. The current version is based on the 1987-2014 period. <br> Seasonal persistent green cover is derived from seasonal fractional cover using a weighted smooth spline fitting routine. This weights a smooth line to the minimum values of the seasonal green cover. This smooth minimum is designed to represent the slower changing green component, ideally consisting of perennial vegetation including over-storey, mid-storey and persistent ground cover. The seasonal persistent green is then summarized using simple linear regression, and the slope of the fitted line is captured in this product. The original units are percentage points per year. Values are later truncated and scaled.

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    This product has been superseded and will not be processed from early 2023. Please find the updated version 3 of this product here <a href="https://portal.tern.org.au/metadata/24072">Seasonal dynamic reference cover method - Landsat, JRSRP algorithm version 3.0, Queensland Coverage</a>. The seasonal dynamic reference cover method images are created using a modified version of the dynamic reference cover method developed by <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2012.02.021">Bastin et al (2012)</a>. This approach calculates a minimum ground cover image over all years to identify locations of most persistent ground cover in years with the lowest rainfall, then uses a moving window approach to calculate the difference between the window's central pixel and its surrounding reference pixels. The output is a difference image between the cover amount of a pixel's reference pixels and the actual cover at that pixel for the season being analysed. Negative values indicate pixels which have less cover than the reference pixels. <br> The main differences between this method and the original method are that this method uses seasonal fractional ground cover rather than the preceding ground cover index (GCI) and this method excludes cleared areas and certain landforms (undulating slopes), which are considered unsuitable for use as reference pixels.

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    The climate adjusted linear seasonal persistent green trend is derived from analysis of the linear seasonal persistent green trend, adjusted for rainfall. The current version is based on the 1987-2014 period. <br> Seasonal persistent green cover is derived from seasonal cover using a weighted smooth spline fitting routine. This weights a smooth line to the minimum values of the seasonal green cover. This smooth minimum is designed to represent the slower changing green component, ideally consisting of perennial vegetation including over-storey, mid-storey and persistent ground cover. The seasonal persistent green is then summarised using simple linear regression, and the slope of the fitted line is captured in the linear seasonal persistent green product. This product is further processed to produce a climate-adjusted version.

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    Three maps are available: 1) foliage projective cover, 2) forest extent, attributed with the foliage projective cover and 3) accuracy of the extent maps, which also acts as masks of forest and other wooded lands. Each pixel in map 1 estimates the fraction of the ground covered by green foliage. Each pixel in map 2 shows two pieces of information. The first is a classification of whether the vegetation is forest or not. The pixels classified as forest are attributed with the second piece of information: the foliage projective cover. Each pixel in map 3 is a class that provides information on the classification accuracies of the woody extent. These maps are derived from Landsat.

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    Foliage Projective Cover (FPC) is the percentage of ground area occupied by the vertical projection of foliage. The Remote Sensing Centre FPC mapping is based on regression models applied to dry season (May to October) Landsat-5 TM, Landsat-7 ETM+ and Landsat-8 OLI imagery for the period 1988-2014. An annual woody spectral index image is created for each year using a multiple regression model trained from field data collected mostly over the period 1996-1999. A robust regression of the time series of the annual woody spectral index is then performed. The estimated foliage projective cover is the prediction at the date of the selected dry season image for 2014. Where this deviates significantly from the woody spectral index for that date, further tests are undertaken before this estimate is accepted. In some cases, the final estimate is the woody spectral index value rather than the robust regression prediction. The product is further masked to remove areas classified as non-woody.

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    The seasonal dynamic reference cover method images are created using a modified version of the dynamic reference cover method developed by <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2012.02.021">Bastin et al (2012) </a>. This approach calculates a minimum ground cover image over all years to identify locations of most persistent ground cover in years with the lowest rainfall, then uses a moving window approach to calculate the difference between the window's central pixel and its surrounding reference pixels. The output is a difference image between the cover amount of a pixel's reference pixels and the actual cover at that pixel for the season being analysed. Negative values indicate pixels which have less cover than the reference pixels. The main differences between this method and the original method are that this method uses seasonal fractional ground cover rather than the preceding ground cover index (GCI) and this method excludes cleared areas and certain landforms (undulating slopes), which are considered unsuitable for use as reference pixels. This product is based upon the JRSRP Fractional Cover 3.0 algorithm.