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    This record is a comprehensive list of vascular plant species from the Biological Survey of South Australia. Preparation from raw data obtained via the Advanced Ecological Knowledge and Observation System (AEKOS; now deprecated) data portal involved the selection of data fields, the removal of intraspecific taxa (only genus and species used to define individual taxa) and removal of duplicate records and those not determined to species.

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    <p> The dataset aims at studying associations between mating system parameters and fitness in natural populations of trees. Fifty-eight open-pollinated progeny arrays were collected from trees in three populations. Progeny were planted in a reciprocal transplant trial. Fitness was measured by family establishment rates. We genotyped all trees and their progeny at eight microsatellite loci. Planting site had a strong effect on fitness, but seed provenance and seed provenance × planting site did not. Populations had comparable mating system parameters and were generally outcrossed, experienced low biparental inbreeding and high levels of multiple paternity. As predicted, seed families that had more multiple paternities also had higher fitness, and no fitness-inbreeding correlations were detected. Demonstrating that fitness was most affected by multiple paternities rather than inbreeding, we provide evidence supporting the constrained inbreeding hypothesis; i.e. that multiple paternity may impact on fitness over and above that of inbreeding, particularly for preferentially outcrossing trees at life stages beyond seed development. This dataset could potentially be reused for meta-analysis or review of effects of habitat fragmentation on plants (e.g. pollination, mating system, genetic diversity etc). Please contact owner prior to re-use. </p> <p>This is part of the authors' PhD at the University of Adelaide, supervised by Prof Andrew Lowe, Dr Mike Gardner and Dr Kym Ottewell. Main goals of the project were 1. Examine and quantify the impact of fragmentation and tree density on mating patterns, and how this may vary with pollinators of differing mobility 2. Determine the theoretical expectations and perform empirical tests of mating pattern-fitness relationships in trees 3. Explore the plant genetic resource management implications that arise from the observations in aims 1 and 2 </p>

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    Microsatellite genotype data for 3 eucalypt species. Data include progeny and adults from across a gradient of habitat fragmentation. These microsatellite data could be further used in additional analyses, e.g. genetic diversity. Samples collected from stands on eucalypts as follows: non-neighbouring adult trees had leaf and seeds collected. Leaf was used to genotype the adults. Seeds were germinated, tissue then collected, and the same microsatellites genotyped - i.e. open-pollinated progeny arrays. The dataset is possibly useful for meta-analysis or review of effects of habitat fragmentation on plants (e.g. mating system, genetic diversity etc).

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    This is a data set on the prescence of Salmonella and the exposure of flavivirus in the Australian White Ibis. The data is presented in an excel file that lists, band numbers, sample dates, age, sex, bill lengths, presence of Salmonella in gut samples, and evidence of exposure to flavivirus for 72 birds sampled in the years 2002, 2003 and 2015 in Sydney, Australia. Detailed results listed in our open accessible manuscript published in the Journal of Urban Ecology in 2019. <em> https://academic.oup.com/jue/article/5/1/juz006/5506280</em>.

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    The dataset describes the occurrence of bird species at sites within a burnt woodland. These sites comprise the following design: 5 replicate block. each with 2 large patch sites, 2 small patch sites and 2 matrix sites. One site of each pair was relatively more isolated than the other (surrounded by a higher proportion of unburnt vegetation). In addition, there are also 6 sites located beyond the extent of the fire. The data-set also lists vegetation attributes at each of these sites.

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    Data were used to demonstrate fitness impacts caused by fragmentation context. Showed extensive pollination can protect tree fitness from fragmentation. Grew open-pollinated progeny arrays of the bird-pollinated, mallee tree <i>Eucalyptus incrassata</i> in a randomised block design in a common garden experiment at Monarto, South Australia. Progeny arrays were collected from parental trees in either continuous forest or highly fragmented contexts. Data are therefore experimental, for hypothesis testing Data are not descriptive ecological, not plot based and not time-series. Data are not a representative sample of <i>Eucalyptus incrassata</i> and not representative of mallee eucalypts.

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    This dataset contains the effect of stress and herbivory on the establishment of alternate provenances of a foundation tree species. This data relates to plant fitness and could be used for more broader studies in this area. We established a common garden experiment within a 238 ha restoration site owned and managed by the South Australian Water Corporation (SA Water), near the township of Clarendon (-35.0882°S, 138.6236°E). We grew ca.1500 seedlings sourced from one local and two non-local provenances of <i>Eucalyptus leucoxylon</i> to test whether local provenancing was appropriate. The three provenances spanned an aridity gradient, with the local provenance sourced from the most mesic area and the distant provenance sourced from the most arid. We explored the effect of provenance on four fitness proxies after 15 months, including survival, above-ground height, susceptibility to insect herbivory, and pathogen related stress.

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    The dataset comprises of a biological and a spatial component. Biological data: This was collated from several sources, collected over the period 2000-2009. Data are lists of presence-absence of 215 native plant species (i.e., exotic species removed) from 76 seasonal wetlands (size range 0.5 - 35 ha) located on the Fleurieu Peninsula, South Australia (centred on latitude 35.5 °S). After data were collated into a single dataset, sampling bias was removed to create a dataset of near-complete census wetlands. Spatial data: For each of the 76 wetlands a small amount of spatial data is also provided, i.e., area, centroids, catchment etc. The dataset could be of interest for any typical community data analysis (e.g. beta diversity, similarity, assembly)- provided only native wetland plant species are of interest. Data presented here were used to model extinction risk, species-area relationships, occupancy distributions and so on.

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    This dataset contains radio-tracking information on the long-haired rats (<i>Rattus villosissimus</i>). Data was collected between October 2011 and December 2012. It contains the data from enclosure in which a radio-collared rat was released and tracked (Enclosure = 1 or 2), the treatment (Cats = yes or no), the exact date (Date) for when a rat was released with a collar (collared_released), the last time it was recorded (last-time-rec), the time period in months over which the collar frequency was detected (time-collar-detected), the fate of the animal (Fate = unknown, dead or alive), the last location change detected (last_loc_change), based on the latter, the estimated time a rat was assumed alive (estimated_time_alive), the last time a signal was detected from the collar (last_signal detected), the date of the last time an animal was trapped (last_trapped), whether dead remains were found (dead_remains_found = na, yes, or no) and whether the collar was found (collar_found = na, yes, or no).

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    FosSahul is the first database compiling the ages of nonhuman vertebrate fossils from the Middle Pleistocene to the present in the Sahul region. It includes comprehensive metadata with ratings of reliability allocated to each fossil age. Because ecological and evolutionary phenomena are time-dependent, the entire range of archaeological and palaeontological research disciplines benefit from the availability of this data.