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    Mating system and fitness data for families of <em>Eucalyptus socialis</em> grown in common garden experiments. Families collected across a fragmentation gradient. Open-pollinated progeny arrays were collected and reared in the common garden experiments. These open-pollinated progeny arrays were also genotyped at microsatellite loci to generate the mating system data. Data showed association between fragmentation on mating system, which in turn impacted fitness. Please contact owner prior to use.

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    The dataset provides information on the Specific Leaf Area (SLA) measurements of the species <i>Dodonaea viscosa</i> from the TERN AusPlots.

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    The dataset consists of results from two stream mesocosm experiments that were conducted in the summer-autumn of 1996 and 1997 to distinguish the influence of fine sediment loads and nutrient concentrations on benthic macro-invertebrate and algal communities. 11 biological variables were extracted from the results of this experiment and were standardized for the purpose of training neural networks that could be used to diagnose nutrient and fine sediment impacts in field surveys. The 11 variables were selected according to how well they correlated with the experimental treatment levels (high and low values of both nutrients and fine sediments). The 11 variables were: chlorophyll a (mg/m2), macro-invertebrate familial richness, total abundance, and the abundance of <em>Oligochaeta, Leptoperla varia (Gripopterygidae), Nousia spp. (Leptophlebiidae), Austrophlebioides spp. (Leptophlebiidae), Orthocladiinae, Tanypodinae, Tipulidae</em> and larval <em>Scirtidae</em>. These taxa were abundant within and among the stream mesocosm communities and are common in a wide range of Tasmanian rivers. Values for each of 11 biological response variables were standardized by dividing by their average value observed in the experimental controls mesocosm samples from that year. See Magierowski RH, Read SM, Carter SJB, Warfe DM, Cook LS, Lefroy EC, et al. (2015) <i>Inferring Landscape-Scale Land-Use Impacts on Rivers Using Data from Mesocosm Experiments and Artificial Neural Networks.</i> PLoS ONE 10(3): e0120901. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0120901 https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0120901. This data was collected for the purpose of training artificial neural networks that could diagnose nutrient and sediment impacts in Tasmanian rivers. Each of the 11 variables were standardized by their average value observed in the experimental control samples from that year and some experimental treatment effects (Light) were ignored to simplify the neural network training process. Therefore, these data should not be used to make conclusions about the impacts of fine sediments and nutrients in Tasmanian rivers.

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    The data set contains distance measures of primary (wind-borne) and secondary (on ground) seed dispersal during spring, summer and autumn, using empirical observations and detailed measurement of wind characteristics. Seeds were collected from populations of <i>Callitris verrucosa</i> within the reserve and was placed parallel to, and 100 m from the burn edge within the burnt site. For the empirical observation of seed dispersal we chose six release locations, three locations in each of the two sites, about 6 km apart that had both recently undergone a planned burn, one in spring 2009 and the other in autumn 2011. Within those two sites the three release locations were positioned 800 m apart from each other along a transect that was placed parallel to, and 100 m from the burn edge within the burnt site. To assess primary (wind-borne) seed dispersal, 20 randomly chosen seeds were released from each of three different heights (1 m, 2 m and 3 m) at each of the six sites, giving a total of 360 seeds released per season. Seeds were only released within a horizontal wind speed range of 8 - 25 km/h. At lower wind speeds seeds would not take-off and at higher wind speeds seeds could not be relocated. This data set could be reused in a similar study carried out for the same species in a different location. <br> To understand the effect of standing vegetation on the secondary (on-ground) seed dispersal, we established groups of 10 seeds on the ground within 10 m of each of the six previous release locations. Seed were left for 4 days before relocated and distances to the starting point were measured. This was repeated during all 3 seasons. Out of the 180 seeds released,161 (89%) seeds could be relocated. <br> Wind measurements were taken on a sand dune crest in the site that was burned during autumn 2011 using an ultrasonic anemometer (Model WindMaster (Part 1590-PK-020), Gill Instruments Ltd, Lymington, UK). Measurements continued for two weeks in spring, summer and autumn. The anemometer measured horizontal wind speed, horizontal wind direction, and vertical wind speed every 0.1 s, producing a dynamic, three dimensional wind speed vector. Measurements were taken at 2 m height. The data can be used for studies dealing with wind movements in mallee during Spring, Summer and Autumn as well as comparative seed dispersal studies using the same or other wind dispersed plant species.

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    Microsatellite genotype data for 3 eucalypt species. Data include progeny and adults from across a gradient of habitat fragmentation. These microsatellite data could be further used in additional analyses, e.g. genetic diversity. Samples collected from stands on eucalypts as follows: non-neighbouring adult trees had leaf and seeds collected. Leaf was used to genotype the adults. Seeds were germinated, tissue then collected, and the same microsatellites genotyped - i.e. open-pollinated progeny arrays. The dataset is possibly useful for meta-analysis or review of effects of habitat fragmentation on plants (e.g. mating system, genetic diversity etc).

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    Age-specific (per year) numbers of human females, males, mortality and fertility rates. Ages 1-100. Number and mortalities from WHO-CHOICE project (www.who.int/choice) and fertility derived from U.S. Census Bureau International Data Base (www.census.gov/population/international/data/idb).

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    This is a collated plant survey data from the Fleurieu Peninsula wetlands (version.2). There is a biological and a spatial component to the dataset. [1] Biological data: This was collated from several sources, collected over the period 2000-2009 and used in the analyses for the paper <i>Diversity patterns of seasonal wetland plant communities mainly driven by rare terrestrial species</i> (Deane et al - Biodiversity and Conservation, DOI: <em>10.1007/s10531-016-1139-1</em>). Biological data were pre-processed to remove sampling bias (the method is described in the paper). Data are presence-absence of 215 native plant species (i.e., exotic species removed) from 76 seasonal wetlands (size range 0.5 - 35 ha) located on the Fleurieu Peninsula, South Australia (centred on latitude 35.5 °S). [2] Spatial data: For each of the 76 wetlands a small amount of spatial data is also provided. Area, centroids, elevation and catchment. The data could be of interest for any typical community data analysis (e.g. beta diversity, similarity, assembly), provided only native wetland plant species were of interest. Data were used to model extinction risk, species-area relationships, occupancy distributions and so on.

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    Data were used to demonstrate fitness impacts caused by fragmentation context. Showed extensive pollination can protect tree fitness from fragmentation. Grew open-pollinated progeny arrays of the bird-pollinated, mallee tree <i>Eucalyptus incrassata</i> in a randomised block design in a common garden experiment at Monarto, South Australia. Progeny arrays were collected from parental trees in either continuous forest or highly fragmented contexts. Data are therefore experimental, for hypothesis testing Data are not descriptive ecological, not plot based and not time-series. Data are not a representative sample of <i>Eucalyptus incrassata</i> and not representative of mallee eucalypts.

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    <p> The dataset aims at studying associations between mating system parameters and fitness in natural populations of trees. Fifty-eight open-pollinated progeny arrays were collected from trees in three populations. Progeny were planted in a reciprocal transplant trial. Fitness was measured by family establishment rates. We genotyped all trees and their progeny at eight microsatellite loci. Planting site had a strong effect on fitness, but seed provenance and seed provenance × planting site did not. Populations had comparable mating system parameters and were generally outcrossed, experienced low biparental inbreeding and high levels of multiple paternity. As predicted, seed families that had more multiple paternities also had higher fitness, and no fitness-inbreeding correlations were detected. Demonstrating that fitness was most affected by multiple paternities rather than inbreeding, we provide evidence supporting the constrained inbreeding hypothesis; i.e. that multiple paternity may impact on fitness over and above that of inbreeding, particularly for preferentially outcrossing trees at life stages beyond seed development. This dataset could potentially be reused for meta-analysis or review of effects of habitat fragmentation on plants (e.g. pollination, mating system, genetic diversity etc). Please contact owner prior to re-use. </p> <p>This is part of the authors' PhD at the University of Adelaide, supervised by Prof Andrew Lowe, Dr Mike Gardner and Dr Kym Ottewell. Main goals of the project were 1. Examine and quantify the impact of fragmentation and tree density on mating patterns, and how this may vary with pollinators of differing mobility 2. Determine the theoretical expectations and perform empirical tests of mating pattern-fitness relationships in trees 3. Explore the plant genetic resource management implications that arise from the observations in aims 1 and 2 </p>

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    There are presence absence records for vegetation and matched hydrological data from 687 1 x 1 m quadrats recorded from 11 wetlands and wetland complexes (28 sampled hydrological gradients (referred to as transects) across the upper and lower southeast of South Australia. Plant data were collected in spring 2013. Hydrological monitoring data at each site consisted of continuous (6 hourly) surface water level data from a state agency monitoring network. Observed water levels at the monitoring instrument on the day of monitoring were related to the observed depth of water at each quadrat, assuming a flat, level water surface and obtain a datum for each quadrat relative to the monitoring instrument. The continuous monitoring record was then used to calculate a range of different hydrological predictors indicating the variation at each quadrat. The hydrological dataset provided are the univariate summary statistics recording different aspects of surface water dynamics for each quadrat. Hydrological predictors (sum-exceedance value, hydroperiod and maximum inundation depth) were calculated for annual and seasonal periods in the three-years prior to plant data collection. See metadata and relevant publication for additional details on calculation. Hydrological predictors for each quadrat are provided in a single matrix of sites by predictors, with relevant location details for the quadrat (xy coordinates, site, transect). Included is a single electrical conductivity class for each transect (ordinal variable - low moderate, high - see metadata). Vegetation data are provided as a single matrix (quadrats x plant functional group) showing presence absence of each functional group in each quadrat. There is also a lookup table giving the assignment of each plant species to a plant functional group.