From 1 - 10 / 19
  • Categories    

    This product provides locations of areas affected by fire including the approximate day of burning. Inputs are daily day time observations from MODIS sensors on Terra and Aqua. Observations are atmospherically corrected and the resulting time series is investigated for sudden changes in reflectance, persistent over multiple days. Variations in observation and illumination geometry are taken into account through application of a kernel driven Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model.

  • Categories    

    Terrestrial laser scans were acquired in native Eucalypt Open Forest (dry sclerophyll Box-Ironbark forest) in Victoria, Australia. Two plots (RUSH06 and RUSH07) with a 40 m radius were established in Rushworth forest and partially harvested in May 2012 to acquire accurate estimates of above-ground biomass. The main tree species in these plots were Eucalyptus leucoxylon, Eucalyptus microcarpa and Eucalyptus tricarpa. Single trees were extracted from the TLS data and quantitative structure models were used to estimate the tree volume directly from the point cloud data. Above-ground biomass (AGB) was inferred from the derived volumes and basic wood density information, and compared with estimates of above-ground biomass derived from allometric equations and destructive sampling. See <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-210X.12301">Calders et al. (2014)</a> and <a href="http://www.vcccar.org.au/publication/final-report/comprehensive-carbon-assessment-program">Murphy et al. (2014)</a> for further information.

  • Categories    

    Statewide composite of fire scars (burnt area) derived from all available Sentinel-2 images acquired over Queensland. It is available in both monthly and annual composites. Fire scars have been mapped using an automated change detection method, with supplementary manual interpretation. This data contains both automated and manually edited data.

  • Categories    

    The data set contains information on Camera Trap Fauna Survey conducted in the Samford Peri-urban Site in 2017. Information on the camera trap site location, height, observation time, species identification and related field remarks have been presented in this data set.

  • Categories    

    This dataset includes upper and lower thermal limits, voluntary exposure to extreme cold and warm temperatures, ATP levels, and longevity of <i>Acyrtociphom pisum</i> and <i>Hippodamia convergens</i>. Pathogens can modify many aspects of host behavior or physiology, with cascading impacts across trophic levels in terrestrial food webs. These changes include thermal tolerance of hosts, however, the effects of fungal infections on thermal tolerances and behavioral responses to extreme temperatures of prey (<i>Acyrtociphon pisum</i>) and predator (<i>Hippodamia convergens</i>) insect species have rarely been studied. We measured the impacts of fungal infection (at two levels: low and high spore load) on thermal tolerance (critical thermal maximum and minimum), voluntary exposure, energetic cost, and survival of both insect species. Fungal infection reduced thermal tolerance to heat in both insect species, but only reduced tolerance to cold of the predator. Voluntary exposure to extreme temperatures was modified by the infection, energetic cost increased with infection and thermal conditions, and survival was significantly reduced in both insect species.

  • Categories    

    This data set contains information on hydrology of small catchments at Warra Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site also referred to as the Warra Tall Eucalypt site, Tasmania. Data on stream flow daily amounts and averages from three sites, Warra, Swanson and King Creek.

  • Categories    

    Evaporation, Transpiration, and Evapotranspiration Products for Australia based on the Maximum Entropy Production model (MEP). This record is an introduction of a method into the MEP algorithm of estimating the required model parameters over the entire continent of Australia through the use of pedotransfer function, soil properties and remotely sensed soil moisture data. The algorithm calculates the evaporation and transpiration over Australia on daily timescales at the 0.05 degree (5 km) resolution for 2003 – 2013. The MEP evapotranspiration (ET) estimates were validated using observed ET data from 20 Eddy Covariance (EC) flux towers across 8 land cover types in Australia and compared the MEP-ET at the EC flux towers with two other ET products over Australia; MOD16 and AWRA-L products. The MEP model outperformed the MOD16 and AWRA-L across the 20 EC flux sites, with average root mean square errors (RMSE), 8.21, 9.87 and 9.22 mm/8 days respectively. The average mean absolute error (MAE) for the MEP, MOD16 and AWRA-L were 6.21, 7.29 and 6.52 mm/8 days, the average correlations were 0.64, 0.57 and 0.61, respectively. The percentage bias of the MEP ET was within 20% of the observed ET at 12 of the 20 EC flux sites while the MOD16 and AWRA-L ET were within 20% of the observed ET at 4 and 10 sites respectively. The analysis showed that evaporation and transpiration contribute 38% and 62%, respectively, to the total ET across the study period which includes a significant part of the “millennium drought” period (2003 – 2009) in Australia. File naming conventions: E – Evaporation T – Transpiration ET – Evapotranspiration For the 8 day ET, Daily T and ET, the suffix nnn indicates day of year, for example: 001 for January 1, 145 for May 25 (leap year) or 26, etc. While for the daily E, the suffix is in the format mmdd (month,day) for example 0101 for January 1, 0525 for May 25.

  • Categories    

    Water quality parameters of the surface water from the Robson Creek Rainforest site. The parameters include water temperature, conductivity, water pH, salinity and dissolved oxygen.

  • Categories    

    The lesser hairy-footed dunnart (<i>Sminthopsis youngsoni, Dasyuridae</i>) is a generalist marsupial insectivore in arid Australia, but consumes wolf spiders (<i>Lycosa spp., Lycosidae</i>) disproportionately often relative to their availability. This project tested the hypothesis that this disproportionate predation is a product of frequent encounter rates between the interactants due to high overlap in their diets and use of space and time. This data set focuses on the dietary aspect. Specifically, invertebrate pitfall trapping was employed to quantify food availability and selectivity for both wolf spiders and <i>S.youngsoni</i>. Pitfall traps were deployed along trails left by tracked individuals, as well as control trails, of both species groups in the north-western Simpson Desert, Queensland. In total, invertebrate pitfall traps were deployed along 11 <i>S.youngsoni</i> and 8 <i>lycosa</i> trails in October 2016. Invertebrates were identified to the level of "Order", except for spiders (Order: Arachnida) and bees, wasps and ants (Order: Hymenoptera) which were identified to the "Family" level using identification keys and were also counted and grouped into seven size classes. This data was used for the following analyses: [1] a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to test whether total numbers of arthropods differed between trail type and species, [2] non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) and [3] permutational analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) to test whether assemblages of arthropod prey and prey sizes differed between the two trail types for each species and between each species.

  • Categories    

    Vegetation Fractional Cover represents the exposed proportion of Photosynthetic Vegetation (PV), Non-Photosynthetic Vegetation (NPV) and Bare Soil (BS) within each pixel. The sum of the three fractions is 100% (+/- 3%) and shown in Red/Green/Blue colors. In forested canopies the photosynthetic or non-photosynthetic portions of trees may obscure those of the grass layer and/or bare soil. This product is derived from the MODIS Nadir BRDF-Adjusted Reflectance product (MCD43A4) collection 6 and has 500 meters spatial resolution. A suite of derivative products are also produced including monthly fractional cover, total vegetation cover (PV+NPV), and anomaly of total cover against the time series. Monthly: The monthly product is aggregated from the 8-day composites using the medoid method. Anomaly: represents the difference between total vegetation cover (PV+NPV) in a given month and the mean total vegetation cover for that month in all years available, expressed in units of cover. For example, if the mean vegetation cover in January (2001-current year) was 40% and the vegetation cover for the pixel in January 2018 was 30%, the anomaly for the pixel in Jan 2018 would be -10%. Decile: represents the ranking (in ten value intervals) for the total vegetation cover in a given month in relation to the vegetation cover in that month for all years in the time-series. MODIS fractional cover has been validated for Australia.