Keyword

Annual

108 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Update frequencies
status
From 1 - 10 / 108
  • Categories    

    The datasets in this series comprise predictions of biocondition for Queensland's Bioregions. The datasets are created using a gradient boosting decision tree (GBDT) model based on eight vegetation specific remote sensing (RS) datasets and 17,000 training sites of known vegetation community and condition state. Condition score was modelled as of the difference in the RS space within homogeneous vegetation communities. The product is intended to represent predicted BioCondition for year 2019 rather than any single date.

  • Categories    

    <p>Digital Cover Photography (DCP) upward-looking images were collected annually to capture vegetation cover at the TERN Karawatha Peri-Urban SuperSite. These images can be used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI), Crown Cover or Foliage Projective Cover (FPC). </p><p> The Karawatha Peri-Urban SuperSite was established in 2007 and decommissioned in 2018. The site was located in Eucalypt forest at Karawatha Forest. For additional site information, see https://deims.org/f15bc7aa-ab4a-443b-a935-dbad3e7101f4 . </p><p> Other images collected at the site include photopoints and ancilliary images of fauna and flora. </p>

  • Categories    

    The woody vegetation extent for Queensland is attributed with an estimated age in years since the last significant disturbance. The method uses a sequential Conditional Random Fields classifier applied to Landsat time series starting 1988 to predict woody cover over the time period. A set of heuristic rules is used to detect and track regrowing woody vegetation in the time series of woody probabilities and record the approximate start and end dates of the most recent regrowth event. Regrowth detection is combined with the Statewide Land and Trees Study (SLATS) Landsat historic clearing data to provide a preliminary estimate of age since disturbance for each woody pixel in the woody extent. The 'last disturbance' may be due to a clearing event or other disturbance such as fire, flood, drought-related death etc. Note that not all recorded disturbances may result in complete loss of woody vegetation, so the estimated age since disturbance does not always represent the age of the ecosystem. The age since disturbance product is derived from multiple satellite image sources and derived products which represent different scales and resolutions: Landsat (30&nbsp;m), Sentinel-2 (10&nbsp;m) and Earth-i (1&nbsp;m).

  • Categories    

    For some time, Remote Sensing Sciences, has produced Foliage Projective Cover (FPC) using a model applied to Landsat surface reflectance imagery, calibrated by field observations. An updated model was developed which relates field measurements of FPC to 2-year time series of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) computed from Landsat seasonal surface reflectance composites. The model is intended to be applied to Landsat and Sentinel-2 satellite imagery, given their similar spectral characteristics. However, due to insufficient field data coincident with the Sentinel-2 satellite program, the model was fitted on Landsat imagery using a significantly expanded, national set of field data than was used for the previous Landsat FPC model fitting. The FPC model relates the field measured green fraction of mid- and over-storey foliage cover to the minimum value of NDVI calculated from 2-years of Landsat seasonal surface reflectance composites. NDVI is a standard vegetation index used in remote sensing which is highly correlated with vegetation photosynthesis. The model is then applied to analogous Sentinel-2 seasonal surface reflectance composites to produce an FPC image at Sentinel-2 spatial resolution (i.e. 10&nbsp;m) using the radiometric relationships established between Sentinel-2 and Landsat in Flood (2017). This is intended to represent the FPC for that 2-year period rather than any single date, hence the date range in the dataset file name. The dataset is generally expected to provide a reasonable estimate of the range of FPC values for any given stand of woody vegetation, but it is expected there will be over- and under-estimation of absolute FPC values for any specific location (i.e. pixel) due to a range of factors. The FPC model is sensitive to fluctuations in vegetation greenness, leading to anomalies such as high FPC on irrigated pastures or locations with very green herbaceous or grass understoreys. A given pixel in the FPC image, represents the predicted FPC in the season with the least green/driest vegetation cover over the 2-year period assumed to be that with the least influence of seasonally variable herbaceous vegetation and grasses on the more seasonally stable woody FPC estimates. The two-year period was used partly because it represents a period relative to tree growth but was also constrained due to the limited availability of imagery in the early Sentinel-2 time series. The FPC dataset is constrained by the woody vegetation extent dataset for the FPC year.

  • Categories    

    The climate adjusted linear seasonal persistent green trend is derived from analysis of the linear seasonal persistent green trend, adjusted for rainfall. The current version is based on the 1987-2014 period. <br> Seasonal persistent green cover is derived from seasonal cover using a weighted smooth spline fitting routine. This weights a smooth line to the minimum values of the seasonal green cover. This smooth minimum is designed to represent the slower changing green component, ideally consisting of perennial vegetation including over-storey, mid-storey and persistent ground cover. The seasonal persistent green is then summarised using simple linear regression, and the slope of the fitted line is captured in the linear seasonal persistent green product. This product is further processed to produce a climate-adjusted version.

  • Categories    

    <p>This data set provides the photosynthetic pathways for 2428 species recorded across 541 plots surveyed by Australia’s Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) between 2011 and 2017 (inclusive). TERN survey plots are 1 ha (100 x 100 m) permanently established sites located in a homogeneous area of terrestrial vegetation. At each plot, TERN survey teams record vegetation composition and structural characteristics and collect a range of plant samples using a point-intercept method. Species were assigned a photosynthetic pathway using literature and carbon stable isotope analysis of bulk tissue collected by TERN at the survey plots. </p><p>The data set is comprised of two data tables and one data descriptor that defines the values in the two data tables. The first table contains a list of each species and its photosynthetic pathway. The second table includes a list of all the peer-reviewed sources used to create this data set. </p><p>This data set will be updated on an annual basis as TERN’s plot network expands and new information becomes available. </p>

  • Categories    

    This dataset contains spatial layers describing Forest Connectivity from 1995-2019, in NSW Regional Forest Agreements (RFA) Areas along the eastern coast. Forest Connectivity accounts for the general quality of terrestrial habitats supporting biodiversity at each location, the fragmentation of habitat within its neighbourhood and how its position in the landscape contributes to connectivity among the habitats across a region. <br> These have been based off the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory (NGGI) National Carbon Accounting System (NCAS) National Forest and Sparse Woody Vegetation Data grids (ABARES, 2020). These base grids are Landsat in origin and have a resolution of 25m. <br> Forest Connectivity, including canopy cover connectivity and fragmentation is concerned and linked to forest condition. Concepts applied are to be aligned with definitions as found in the NSW Biodiversity Indicator Program (BIP) and the Spatial Links methodology for calculating connectivity.<br> Base cover extent grids used are from the NSW RFA Historic Forest Canopy Cover Extent – 1995 to 2019 product. <br> Read more about the project on the Natural Resources Commission website:<br> https://www.nrc.nsw.gov.au/fmip-baselines-ecosystem-health-projectfe1<br> This dataset is superseded by 'NSW Forest Monitoring and Improvement Program State-Wide Historic Forest Connectivity - 1995 to 2020'

  • Categories    

    The physical drivers of ecosystem formation – macroclimate, lithology and landform – along with vegetation structural formations are key determinants of current ecosystem type. Each combination of these ecosystem drivers – each ‘ecological facet’ – provides a unique set of opportunities and challenges for life. <br> Management and conservation should seek to understand and take in to account these drivers of ecosystem formation. By understanding the unique combinations of these drivers management strategies can plan for their full range of variation, and conservation efforts can ensure that unique ecosystems are not lost. Unfortunately, there is currently no Australia-wide standardized map of ecological facets at management-appropriate scales. <br> By understanding the magnitude and distribution of unique combinations of these drivers, management strategies can plan for their full range of variation, and conservation efforts can ensure that unique ecosystems are not lost. Additionally, by improving our understanding of the past and present conditions that have given rise to current ecological facets this dataset could facilitate future predictive environmental modelling. Finally, this data could assisting biodiversity conservation, climate change impact studies and mitigation, ecosystem services assessment, and development planning <br> Further information about the dataset can be found at <a href="https://ternaus.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/TERNSup/pages/2276130817/GEOSS+Ecosystem+Map">GEOSS Ecosystem Map,TERN Knowledge Base </a> .

  • Categories    

    <br>The NSW Carbon Monitoring project is a collaboration between the Natural Resources Commission of NSW and Mullion Group to develop a spatial time-series dataset of forest carbon history for the state of NSW at ~25m resolution. The project used FLINTpro software to integrate historical environmental and land management data to model carbon stock and fluxes. Aboveground biomass refers to the amount of carbon stored within aboveground forest components (pools) which includes leaves, branches, bark and stems. Belowground biomass refers to the amount of carbon stored within belowground forest components (pools) which includes coarse and fine roots. Dead Organic Matter refers to the amount of carbon stored within dead forest components (pools) which includes leaf litter, branch litter, bark litter, stem litter, and dead roots. Carbon stored within soil and harvested wood products is not included within any of these datasets.</br> <br>This dataset has been superseeded by <a href="https://portal.tern.org.au/metadata/TERN/b9eab336-0ccc-43cd-9d44-e1e6207a2575">NSW Forest Carbon Stock - Aboveground, Belowground and Dead Organic Matter Carbon Mass 1990-2021</a></br>

  • Categories    

    <p>Digital Hemispherical Photography (DHP) upward-looking images were collected annually to capture vegetation and crown cover at Whroo Dry Eucalypt SuperSite. These images can be used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI), Crown Cover or Foliage Projective Cover (FPC). </p><p> The site was established in 2010 in box woodland dominated by <em>Eucalyptus microcarpa</em> (grey box) and <em>eucalyptus leucoxylon</em> (yellow gum). For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/whroo-dry-eucalypt-supersite/. </p><p> Other images collected at the site include photopoints, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed overstorey cameras and ancilliary images of fauna and flora. </p>