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    This dataset consists of measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer in semi-arid Mulga woodland, using eddy covariance techniques. <br /> <br /> The Alice Springs Mulga flux station is located on Pine Hill cattle station, near Alice Springs in the Northern Territory. The woodland is characterized by the Acacia aneura canopy, which is 6.5m tall on average. Elevation of the site is 606m above sea level, and the terrain is flat. Mean annual precipitation at the nearby (45km distant) Bureau of Meteorology station is 305.9mm but ranges between 100mm in 2009 to 750mm in 2010. Predominant wind directions are from the southeast and east.The extent of the woodland is 11km to the east of the flux station and 16km to the south. The soil is red sandy clay (50:50 sand:clay) overlying a 49m deep water table. Pine Hill Station is a functioning cattle station that has been in operation for longer than 50 years.The instrument mast is 13.7m tall. Fluxes of heat, water vapour and carbon are measured using the open-path eddy covariance technique at 11.6m. Supplementary measurements above the canopy include temperature and humidity (11.6m), windspeed and wind direction (9.25m), downwelling and upwelling shortwave and longwave radiation (12.2m). Precipitation is monitored in a canopy gap (2.5m). Supplementary measurements within and below the canopy include barometric pressure (1m), wind speed (2m, 4.25m and 6.5m), and temperature and humidity (2m, 4.25m and 6m). Below ground soil measurements are made in bare soil, mulga, and understory habitats and include ground heat flux (0.08m), soil temperature (0.02m – 0.06m) and soil moisture (0 – 0.1m, 0.1 – 0.3m, 0.6 – 0.8m and 1.0 – 1.2m). Ancillary measurements include soil water and carbon fluxes, leaf water potential, leaf gas exchange, stem basal area, stem growth, litter production, leaf area index, stem hydraulic conductance, and carbon and water stable isotope ratios. The site was established in September 2010 in conjunction with the Woodforde River NGCRT Superscience Site and is managed by the University of Technology Sydney. <br />For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/alice-mulga-supersite/ <br /><br /> This data is also available at http://data.ozflux.org.au .

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    <p>Digital Hemispherical Photography (DHP) upward-looking images are collected three times per year to capture vegetation and crown cover at the Gingin Banksia Woodland SuperSite. These images are used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI). </p> <p> The Gingin Banksia Woodland SuperSite was established in 2011 and is located in a natural woodland of high species diversity with an overstorey dominated by Banksia species. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/gingin-banksia-woodland-supersite/. </p><p> Other images collected at the site include digital cover photography (DCP), photopoints, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed under and overstorey cameras and ancillary images of fauna and flora. </p>

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    <p>Digital Hemispherical Photography (DHP) images are collected twice per year to capture vegetation and crown cover at Robson Creek Rainforest SuperSite. Images are taken at the end of the wet season and the end of the dry season and the dates will differ each year. These images are used to estimate maximum (wet season) and minimum (dry season) Leaf area index (LAI) for the rainforest biome. </p><p> The 25 hectare site was established in 2009 and lies on the Atherton Tablelands in the wet tropical rainforests of Australia at 680-740 m elevation. It is situated in Danbulla National Park within the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. The forest is classified as Regional Ecosystem (RE) 7.3.36a, complex mesophyll vine forest (Queensland Government 2006). The climate is seasonal with approximately 60% of rain falling between January and March and the landform is moderately inclined with a low relief. There are 208 species in the site, and average canopy height is 28 m, ranging from 23 to 44 m. All stems ≥ 10 cm diameter are measured, tagged and mapped. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/robson-creek-rainforest-supersite/. </p><p> Other bioimages collected at the site include photopoints, phenocam images taken from fixed under and overstorey cameras and ancillary images of fauna and flora. </p>

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    Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP) upward-looking images are collected up to three times per year to capture vegetation cover at Boyagin Wandoo Woodland SuperSite. These images can be used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI), Crown Cover or Foliage Projective Cover (FPC). The Boyagin Wandoo Woodland SuperSite was established in 2017 in Wandoo Woodland, which is surrounded by broadacre farming. About 80% of the overstorey cover is <em>Eucalyptus accedens</em>. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/boyagin-wandoo-woodland-supersite/ . Digital Cover Photography was also collected at Boyagin from 2019.

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    This dataset consists of measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer in temperate eucalypt woodland using eddy covariance techniques. <br /><br /> The Great Western Woodlands (GWW) comprise a 16 million hectare mosaic of temperate woodland, shrubland and mallee vegetation in south-west Western Australia. The region has remained relatively intact since European settlement, owing to the variable rainfall and lack of readily accessible groundwater. The woodland component is globally unique in that nowhere else do woodlands occur at as little as 220 mm mean annual rainfall. Further, other temperate woodlands around the world have typically become highly fragmented and degraded through agricultural use. The Great Western Woodlands Site was established in 2012 in the Credo Conservation Reserve. The site is in semi-arid woodland and was operated as a pastoral lease from 1907 to 2007. The core 1 ha plot is characterised by <em>Eucalyptus salmonophloia</em> (salmon gum), with <em>Eucalyptus salubris</em> and <em>Eucalyptus clelandii</em> dominating other research plots. The flux station is located in Salmon gum woodland. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/great-western-woodlands-supersite/ . <br /><br />This data is also available at http://data.ozflux.org.au .

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    <p>Digital Cover Photography (DCP) upward-looking images are collected up to three times per year to capture vegetation cover at Samford Peri-Urban SuperSite. These images can be used to estimate Leaf Area Index (LAI), Crown Cover or Foliage Projective Cover (FPC). </p><p> The Samford Peri-Urban SuperSite was established in 2010 in remnant fringe eucalypt forest, near urban development in the Samford Valley. The upper storey is dominated by <em>Corymbia intermedia</em>, <em>Eucalyptus siderophloia</em> and <em>Lophostemon suaveolens</em>. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/samford-peri-urban-supersite/ . </p><p> Other images collected at the site include photopoints, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed overstorey cameras, panoramic landscape and ancillary images of fauna and flora.</p>

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    This dataset consists of measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer in dry sclerophyll forest using eddy covariance techniques. <br /> <br /> The Cumberland Plain flux station is located in a dry sclerophyll forest. The Cumberland Plain Woodland is now an endangered ecological community that encompasses distinct groupings of plants growing on clayey soils. The canopy is dominated by <em>Eucalyptus moluccana</em> and <em>Eucalyptus fibrosa</em>, which host an expanding population of mistletoe. Average canopy height is 23m, the elevation of the site is 20m and mean annual precipitation is 800mm. <br /> <br />Fluxes of water vapour, carbon dioxide and heat are quantified with the open-path eddy flux technique from a 30 m tall mast. Additional measurements above the canopy include temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction, rainfall, incoming and reflected shortwave and longwave radiation and net, diffuse and direct radiation and the photochemical reflectance index. In addition, profiles of humidity and CO2 are measured at eight levels within the canopy, as well as measurements of soil moisture content, soil heat fluxes, soil temperature, and 10-hr fuel moisture dynamics. In addition, regular monitoring of understory species abundance, mistletoe infection, leaf area index and litterfall are also performed. <br />For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/cumberland-plain-supersite/ . <br /><br />This data is also available at http://data.ozflux.org.au .

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    <p>Digital Cover Photography (DCP) upward-looking images were collected annually to capture vegetation cover at the TERN Karawatha Peri-Urban SuperSite. These images can be used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI), Crown Cover or Foliage Projective Cover (FPC). </p><p> The Karawatha Peri-Urban SuperSite was established in 2007 and decommissioned in 2018. The site was located in Eucalypt forest at Karawatha Forest. For additional site information, see https://deims.org/f15bc7aa-ab4a-443b-a935-dbad3e7101f4 . </p><p> Other images collected at the site include photopoints and ancilliary images of fauna and flora. </p>

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    This dataset consists of images of fauna, flora, fungi or general scenery or events captured at the site on an ad-hoc basis and may provide the researcher with information regarding the species that occupy, frequent or traverse this site.<br /> <br /> The Karawatha Peri-Urban SuperSite was established in 2007 and decommissioned in 2018. The site was located in Eucalypt forest at Karawatha Forest. For additional site information, see https://w3id.org/tern/resources/b6a430ed-fe09-4674-ac94-15b1f4672ce4 . <br /> <br /> Other images collected at the site include photopoints and digital cover photography.

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    <p>Digital Hemispherical Photography (DHP) upward-looking images are collected twice per year to capture vegetation and crown cover at the Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite. These images are used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI). The images are captured at the times of estimated maximum and minimum LAI. </p> <p> The Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite was established in 2012 and is located in a stand of tall, mixed-aged <em>Eucalyptus obliqua</em> forest (1.5, 77 and &gt;250 years-old) with a rainforest / wet sclerophyll understorey and a dense man-fern (<em>Dicksonia antarctica</em>) ground-layer. The site experienced a fire in January 2019, which consumed the ground layer and killed a high proportion of the understorey trees but stimulated dense seedling regeneration. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/warra-tall-eucalypt-supersite/. </p><p> Other images collected at the site include photopoints, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed under and overstorey cameras, panoramic landscape and ancillary images of fauna and flora. </p>