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    We conducted a four-step Delphi expert elicitation procedure. This approach allowed us to address the gaps in knowledge regarding national koala populations with the robustness of collective judgement. The four steps of the Delphi method ask for an upper estimate, a lower estimate, a best guess and a percentage confidence interval. Prior to the commencement of the workshop, the participants were required to complete the first round of the questionnaire. These results were then re-evaluated during the workshop and a second round of elicitation was conducted. The outcome of the two workshops will be a synthesis of the distribution and abundance of koalas, population trends, and a region-specific summary of threats to koalas. Peer-reviewed journal publications will be produced. The information will be used to inform researchers, managers and decision-makers to ensure that viable koala populations persist across their natural range.

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    <br>The aim of this project is to compile land use and management practices and their observed and measured impacts and effects on vegetation condition. The results provide land managers and researchers with a tool for reporting and monitoring spatial and temporal transformations of Australia’s native vegetated landscapes due to changes in land use and management practices. Following are the details about the Taroom Shire site in Queensland, Australia. </br><br> Pre-European benchmark-analogue vegetation: the site was originally a brigalow, <em>Acacia harpophylla</em>, mixed community associated with several overstorey species, including <em>Eucalyptus coolabah</em>, <em>E. cambageana</em>, <em>Casuarina cristata</em>, a range of understorey species, grassy woodlands and open forests. </br><br> Brief chronology of changes in land use and management:<ul style="list-style-type: disc;"> <li>1860: Area used for sheep grazing by shepherds</li> <li>1870: Permanent fences established</li> <li>1875: Start of continuous or set stocking with sheep</li> <li>1880: Incursion of prickly pear started</li> <li>1935: Prickly pear had been destroyed</li> <li>1929-1932: Land clearance through ringbarking</li> <li>1929-1932: Gradual increase in cattle numbers decline in sheep</li> <li>1940-1955: Manual clearing of brigalow with axes issues with regrowth</li> <li>1960-62: Brigalow pulled mechanically and soil ploughed</li> <li>1962: Soil ploughed and sown to buffel grass pasture</li> <li>1962-65: Continuous grazing with cattle on buffel grass pasture</li> <li>1966-75: Soil ploughed and sown to wheat annually – cattle graze stubble</li> <li>1976: Soil ploughed and sown to buffel grass pasture</li> <li>1976-2000: Continuous grazing with cattle on buffel grass pasture</li> <li>2001-10: Soil ploughed and sown to wheat annually – cattle graze stubble.</li></ul></br>

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    This data contains stem diameter, height measurement and above ground living biomass calculations for a Eucalyptus dominated woodland from 2015 - present. Diameter and height measurements for stems ≥10cm diameter at breast height were sampled within the core 1 ha plot within the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt site.

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    The ACEAS working group has developed a framework to evaluate the extent to which fire regimes are driven by climate and other environmental variables, and whether these fire and environment relationships concord with: (a) predictions of the group of conceptual models recently developed; and (b) predictions of process-based models. The dataset provides a distribution of major fire regimes niches throughout Australia ordered according to decreasing annual net primary productivity. The dataset published is the distribution of major fire regimes niches throughout Australia.

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    The composition of many eastern Australian woodland and forest bird assemblages is controlled by a single, hyper-aggresive native bird, the noisy miner <em>Manorina melanocephala</em>. The "Avifaunal disarry from a single despotic species" working group harnessed diverse existing datasets and used them to develop and test models of noisy miner occupancy and impacts. Two datasets are published based on the analysis and synthesis.

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    This terrestrial LiDAR dataset captures detailed vegetation structural information at the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt site in NSW, Australia. The purpose of this data is to enhance understanding of vegetation dynamics and ecosystem function in the region. The dataset is part of a broader collection of Terrestrial LiDAR data acquired from all TERN SuperSites, aimed at achieving a standardized and highly detailed capture of 3D vegetation structure across Australia.