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    This dataset contains the number (count) of dingo, red fox and feral cat photographs from remote camera traps in the Simpson Desert. Note, spatial location for the sites has been desensitized. Please contact the data author for site details.

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    <p>This database contains occurrence data for vertebrates across the Australian Wet Tropics. Species occurrence point data has been collected during field intensive surveys using a variety of sampling methods as well as from the literature and institutional databases. The records are divided into two tables: Misc_records and STD_records. The first contains records collated opportunistically, as well as records collected from literature. The latter is a collection of standardized surveys conducted by Steve E. Williams (JCU). </p> <p> All occurrences were vetted for positional and taxonomic accuracy, and for sensitivity at the state and national levels. Sensitive species records are withheld or have their location generalised following sensitive species rules for processing these records. </p>

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    This dataset comprises of new, high precision radiocarbon dates for 20 mainland thylacines and 24 mainland devils. Metadata includes museum accession numbers and origin of specimens. We envision that this dataset could be used in studies of paleo-ecological reconstructions and for estimating extinction time for both devils and thylacines on mainland Australia. This dataset includes the youngest reliable fossil ages for both species on mainland Australia as per the criteria set out in Rodriguez-Rey at al (2015). <i>"Criteria for assessing the quality of Middle Pleistocene to Holocene vertebrate fossil ages."</i> Quaternary Geochronology 30 (2015): 69-79.

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    This data set contains information on the Lizard Assemblages in Karawatha Peri-Urban site, South East Queensland. Site details, sampling methods and total number of individual animals is listed for each plot location.

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    The lesser hairy-footed dunnart (<i>Sminthopsis youngsoni, Dasyuridae</i>) is a generalist marsupial insectivore in arid Australia, but consumes wolf spiders (<i>Lycosa spp., Lycosidae</i>) disproportionately often relative to their availability. This project tested the hypothesis that this disproportionate predation is a product of frequent encounter rates between the interactants due to high overlap in their diets and use of space and time. This data set focuses on the dietary aspect. Specifically, invertebrate pitfall trapping was employed to quantify food availability and selectivity for both wolf spiders and <i>S.youngsoni</i>. Pitfall traps were deployed along trails left by tracked individuals, as well as control trails, of both species groups in the north-western Simpson Desert, Queensland. In total, invertebrate pitfall traps were deployed along 11 <i>S.youngsoni</i> and 8 <i>lycosa</i> trails in October 2016. Invertebrates were identified to the level of "Order", except for spiders (Order: Arachnida) and bees, wasps and ants (Order: Hymenoptera) which were identified to the "Family" level using identification keys and were also counted and grouped into seven size classes. This data was used for the following analyses: [1] a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to test whether total numbers of arthropods differed between trail type and species, [2] non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) and [3] permutational analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) to test whether assemblages of arthropod prey and prey sizes differed between the two trail types for each species and between each species.

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    The lesser hairy-footed dunnart (<i>Sminthopsis youngsoni, Dasyuridae</i>) is a generalist marsupial insectivore in arid Australia, but consumes wolf spiders (<i>Lycosa spp., Lycosidae</i>) disproportionately often relative to their availability. This project tested the hypothesis that this disproportionate predation is a product of frequent encounter rates between the interactants due to high overlap in their diets and use of space and time. This data set focuses on overlap in the diel acttivity patterns wolf spiders (<i>Lycosa spp.</i>) and the lesser hairy-footed dunnart (<i>Sminthopsis youngsoni</i>) in the Simpson Desert, south-western Queensland Australia. To quantify the temporal activity of lycosids, spotlight surveys were conducted in October 2016 every hour between dusk (19:30 h) and dawn (05:30 h) over three nights. Additionally, remote camera traps were deployed to further quantify patterns in the activity of lycosids and S. youngsoni. Twenty-four Reconyx PC800 HyperfireTM cameras were deployed on 7th July 2016 at Main Camp and left until 12th October 2016 (98 days, or 2352 h of deployment). Images were tagged with camera location, position, angle, camera ID number, species and confidence and date and time data were extracted from each image. This data was used to identify mean activity times for each species (with confidence intervals) and to assess overlap in nocturnal activity patterns between lycosids and S. youngsoni, and thus the potential for competition and predation using the Overlap v 0.2.7 package in R. This data presents a useful example for investigating how the 'Overlap' package works and the benefits it provides.

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    The lesser hairy­footed dunnart (<i>Sminthopsis youngsoni, Dasyuridae</i>) is a generalist marsupial insectivore in arid Australia, but consumes wolf spiders (<i>Lycosa spp., Lycosidae</i>) disproportionately often relative to their availability. This project tested the hypothesis that this disproportionate predation is a product of frequent encounter rates between the interactants due to high overlap in their diets and use of space and time. This data set focuses on overlap in the use of different microhabitats of wolf spiders (<i>Lycosa spp.</i>) and the lesser hairy­footed dunnart (<i>Sminthopsis youngsoni</i>) in the Simpson Desert, south­western Queensland Australia. Microhabitat use was determined by estimating the percentage cover of seven microhabitat variables and distance to nearest cover along trails left by individuals of each species­ group and a randomly orientated (control) trail for each actual trail as a measure of the availability of each microhabitat within the local environment. Trail length was also recorded and data was collected across 16 trapping grids at Main Camp during July and October (winter and Spring) in 2017. Differences in microhabitat use between trail types (actual vs control) and species (lycosids vs dunnarts) were assessed using non­metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) and permutational analyses of variance (PERMANOVA). These analyses were performed using this data.

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    This dataset contains radio-tracking information on the long-haired rats (<i>Rattus villosissimus</i>). Data was collected between October 2011 and December 2012. It contains the data from enclosure in which a radio-collared rat was released and tracked (Enclosure = 1 or 2), the treatment (Cats = yes or no), the exact date (Date) for when a rat was released with a collar (collared_released), the last time it was recorded (last-time-rec), the time period in months over which the collar frequency was detected (time-collar-detected), the fate of the animal (Fate = unknown, dead or alive), the last location change detected (last_loc_change), based on the latter, the estimated time a rat was assumed alive (estimated_time_alive), the last time a signal was detected from the collar (last_signal detected), the date of the last time an animal was trapped (last_trapped), whether dead remains were found (dead_remains_found = na, yes, or no) and whether the collar was found (collar_found = na, yes, or no).

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    Predation by feral cats <i>Felis sylvestris catus</i> is currently one hypothesized cause for the recent dramatic small mammal declines across northern Australia. We conducted a field experiment to measure the effect of predation by for this areas typically low-density cat populations on the demography of a native small mammal which due to the now natural scarce abundance of small mammals in the wild had to be reintroduced. We established two 12.5-ha enclosures in tropical savanna woodland on Wongalara Sanctuary, south of Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory. Each enclosure was divided in half, with cats allowed access to one half but not the other. We introduced about 20 individuals of <i>Rattus villosissimus</i>, a native rodent, into each of the four compartments (two enclosures x two predator-access treatments) and monitored rat demography by mark-recapture analysis and radio-tracking, and predator incursions by camera surveillance and track and scat searches. The data can be used for the mark-recapture analysis. The radio-tracking data and predator incursions data will be uploaded separately. The Cat and Dingoes camera trap dataset was produced using a heat-in-motion cameras (Reconyx PC800 Hyperfire, Holmen, Wisconsin, USA) around the outside of the perimeter fences to detect predators. At least four (but up to six and always the same number of cameras at a time) cameras were placed as one camera installed at each side on the outside of the fences of each enclosure. Cameras were un-baited, to avoid attracting predators. This one file dataset contains the information on the presence/absence data of cats and dingoes on each day. 'Site' indicates the enclosure the camera was attached to ('Enclosure_I' or Enclosure_II'), 'Camera number' indicates which site the camera was on. Note that between October 2011 and April 2012, Enclosure II had two additional cameras (one facing the front gate and one additional monitoring the lower half of the back fence of the enclosure) which resulted in a total of six cameras for during that time. 'Date' indicates the date the photo(s) was/were taken, 'Photos_recorded' whether the camera was operational or photos were retained (e.g. one SD-cards was lost). And columns 'Dingo' and 'Cat' indicate whether these animals were present that day or not (na = no photos recorded, 0 = not present that day, 1 = present that day).

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    The record contains information on mammal captures from the Karawatha forest park in South East Queensland, Karawatha in the year 2010. Data on the number of captures of mammal species and the type of trap used for captures are provided.