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    This terrestrial LiDAR dataset captures detailed vegetation structural information at the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt site in NSW, Australia. The purpose of this data is to enhance understanding of vegetation dynamics and ecosystem function in the region. The dataset is part of a broader collection of Terrestrial LiDAR data acquired from all TERN SuperSites, aimed at achieving a standardized and highly detailed capture of 3D vegetation structure across Australia.

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    This dataset is a collection of drone lidar data from plots across Australia (AusPlots, SuperSites, Cal/Val sites to be established in the future). The aim of these drone surveys is to capture vegetation structure. The standardised data collection and data processing protocols developed in 2022 are based on the DJI Matrice 300 (M300) RTK drone platform. Lidar sensor DJI Zenmuse L1 is used with DJI Matrice 300 (M300) RTK platform to capture RGB colourised 3D point clouds. The data is georeferenced using the onboard GNSS in M300 and the D-RTK 2 base station. DJI Terra software was used to generate 3D point clouds from the raw lidar data. The protocols include flight planning and data collection guidelines for a 100 x 100 m TERN plot, and the processing workflow used on DJI Terra. Mission-specific metadata for each plot is provided in the imagery/metadata folder (please refer to the imagery collection). The Drone Data Collection and Lidar Processing protocols can be found at <em> https://www.tern.org.au/field-survey-apps-and-protocols/ </em>.

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    <br>The aim of this project is to compile land use and management practices and their observed and measured impacts and effects on vegetation condition. The results provide land managers and researchers with a tool for reporting and monitoring spatial and temporal transformations of Australia’s native vegetated landscapes due to changes in land use and management practices. Following are the details about South Brooman State Forest, NSW. </br><br> Pre-European reference-analogue vegetation: The site was originally eucalypt tall open forest, multi-aged open, dry sclerophyll forest. The main overstorey species were spotted gum (<em>Corymbia maculata</em>), <em>Eucalyptus muelleriana</em>, <em>E. paniculata</em>, <em>E. pilularis</em>. The main understorey species were <em>Acacia spp.</em>, <em>Acmena spp.</em> </br><br> Brief chronology of changes in land use and management:<ul style="list-style-type: disc;"> <li>1830: Unmodified</li> <li>1880: Area picked over for high quality sawlogs</li> <li>1945: Area picked over for high quality sawlogs</li> <li>1949: Sawlog harvesting - 85% of area</li> <li>1959: Sawlog harvesting - 85% of area</li> <li>1968: Commercial Thinning - 25% of area</li> <li>1969: Area left to rehabilitate</li> <li>1994: Wildfire - 100% of the area</li> <li>1996: Pole harvesting - 5% of area</li> <li>1998: Sawlog harvesting - 20% of the area</li> <li>1999 and 2003: Hazard reduction</li> <li>1997: Site was burnt (prescribed fire) followed by drought</li> <li>2004-2011: Area left to rehabilitate</li></ul></br>