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    <p>Digital Cover Photography (DCP) upward-looking images are collected twice per year to capture vegetation cover within the core hectare at Cumberland Plain SuperSite. These images can be used to estimate Leaf area index (LAI), Crown Cover or Foliage Projective Cover (FPC). The images are captured at the times of estimated maximum and minimum LAI. In addition, DCP images have been taken on a monthly basis from 2018-2020 at a subset of sites in the core hectare, co-located with litterfall traps and under-canopy radiation sensors, to evaluate more detailed seasonal dynamics of LAI and other aspects of canopy growth. </p><p>The Cumberland Plain SuperSite was established in 2012 in endangered remnant Eucalyptus woodland and is subject to pressure from invasive weeds, altered fire regimes, urban development, conversion to agriculture and extreme climate events. However, the woodland is in excellent condition with the exception of edge effects. The site is located on the Hawkesbury Campus of the University of Western Sydney in New South Wales. For additional site information, see https://deims.org/a1bb29d8-197c-4181-90d8-76083afd44bb/ . </p><p>Other images collected at the site include photopoints, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed overstorey cameras, and ancillary images of fauna and flora. </p>

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    This dataset consists of images of fauna, flora, fungi or general scenery or events captured at the site on an ad-hoc basis and may provide the researcher with information regarding the species that occupy, frequent or traverse this site.<br /> <br /> The Cumberland Plain SuperSite was established in 2012 in endangered remnant Eucalyptus woodland and is subject to pressure from invasive weeds, altered fire regimes, urban development, conversion to agriculture and extreme climate events. However, the woodland is in excellent condition with the exception of edge effects. The site is located on the Hawkesbury Campus of the University of Western Sydney in New South Wales. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/cumberland-plain-supersite/ <br /><br /> Other images collected at the site include digital cover photography, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed overstorey cameras, and photopoint images.

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    High quality digital site reference images are captured for the core 1 hectare vegetation plot of the site on an annual basis to provide context for researchers to understand the general layout and vegetation of the study site, and as a visual reference to monitor any changes over time. Photopoints will be taken annually using the five point photopoint method. The set of images for each year usually consists of twenty images: four images taken at each corner of the plot facing each of the four cardinal points, and four images taken from the centre of the plot facing each corner. <br /><br /> The Cumberland Plain SuperSite was established in 2012 in endangered remnant Eucalyptus woodland and is subject to pressure from invasive weeds, altered fire regimes, urban development, conversion to agriculture and extreme climate events. However, the woodland is in excellent condition with the exception of edge effects. The site is located on the Hawkesbury Campus of the University of Western Sydney in New South Wales. For additional site information, see https://deims.org/a1bb29d8-197c-4181-90d8-76083afd44bb/ . <br /> </p><p>Other images collected at the site include digital cover photography, phenocam time-lapse images taken from fixed overstorey cameras, and ancillary images of fauna and flora.

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files for Cumberland Plain Woodland SuperSite. was established in 2012 in a protected remnant of Shale Gravel Transition Forest, located on the Hawkesbury Campus of the University of Western Sydney in New South Wales. The vegetation at the site is dominated by <em>Eucalyptus moluccana</em> and <em>E. fibrosa</em>, which have hosted a population of mistletoe (<em>Amyema miquelii</em>); a subcanopy of <em>Melaleuca decora</em> is visible in some gaps. The ecosystem is subject to pressure from altered fire regimes, urban development, conversion to agriculture and extreme climate events. However, the forest patch at the site is in excellent condition with the exception of edge effects. For additional site information, see <a href="https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/cumberland-plain-supersite">Cumberland Plain Woodland SuperSite</a></p> <p>In 2019 four acoustic recorders were set up to collect audio data continuously as part of the Australian Acoustic Observatory (A2O) project. Two recorders were placed in relatively wet habitats and two in relatively dry habitats.</p>

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files for TERN Cumberland Plain Woodland SuperSite. Long-term recordings of the environment can be used to identify sound sources of interest, characterise the soundscape, aid in the assessment of fauna biodiversity, monitor temporal trends and track environmental changes.</p> <p>Cumberland Plain Woodland SuperSite was established in 2012 in a protected remnant of Shale Gravel Transition Forest, located on the Hawkesbury Campus of the University of Western Sydney in New South Wales. The vegetation at the site is dominated by <em>Eucalyptus moluccana</em> and <em>E. fibrosa</em>, which have hosted a population of mistletoe (<em>Amyema miquelii</em>); a subcanopy of <em>Melaleuca decora</em> is visible in some gaps. The ecosystem is subject to pressure from altered fire regimes, urban development, conversion to agriculture and extreme climate events. However, the forest patch at the site is in excellent condition with the exception of edge effects. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/cumberland-plain-supersite/.</p> <p>In 2011 an acoustic recorder was set up to collect audio data for a total of 12 hours per day, split between six hours around dawn and six hours around dusk. A second recorder was added in 2012, and two more were added in 2014. The recording schedule aimed at capturing morning and evening bird choruses while minimizing memory and battery requirements. A long-term spectrogram has been generated for each audio file to aid in data exploration. The sensors also recorded temperature, minimum- maximum- and mean-sound pressure levels.</p> <p>Data are made available through the data link. For downloading large amount of data, please follow these instructions <a href="https://ternaus.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/TERNSup/pages/2530148353/How+to+download+TERN+s+acoustic+data+in+bulk">How to download TERN's acoustic data in bulk</a></p>

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    <p>Fixed cameras installed at the Cumberland Plain SuperSite provide a time series of fine scale data as a long-term record of vegetation structure and condition. This dense time series of phenocam images provides data for analysis of ecological responses to climate variability, and when consolidated across the entire terrestrial ecosystem research network, supports calibration and validation of satellite-derived remote sensing data, ensuring delivery of higher quality results for broader scale environmental monitoring products.</p> <p>Images are captured half hourly during daylight hours. Images and data products, including timeseries of the Green Chromatic Coordinate (Gcc) for a region-of-interest (ROI) that delineates an area of specific vegetation type, are made available on an almost real-time basis.</p> <p>The Cumberland Plain SuperSite was established in 2012 in a protected remnant of Shale Gravel Transition Forest, located on the Hawkesbury Campus of the University of Western Sydney in New South Wales. The vegetation at the site and in the images is dominated by <i>Eucalyptus moluccana</i> and <i>E. fibrosa</i>, which have hosted a population of mistletoe (<i>Amyema miquelii</i>); a subcanopy of <i>Melaleuca decora</i> is visible in some gaps. More ecological details about the site are available in Griebel et al. (2021). The ecosystem is subject to pressure from altered fire regimes, urban development, conversion to agriculture and extreme climate events. However, the forest patch at the site is in excellent condition with the exception of edge effects. For additional site information, see https://deims.org/a1bb29d8-197c-4181-90d8-76083afd44bb/ .</p> <p>Other images collected at the site include photopoints, digital cover photography (DCP), and ancillary images of fauna and flora.</p>