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    The dataset includes three csv files: [1] effects of pre-inhabitation and viruses on the feeding behavior of <i>Rhopalosiphum padi</i> and <i>R. maidis</i> (min). [2] Effects of pre-inhabitation and viruses on the fecundity of<i> R. padi</i> and <i>R. maidis</i> (total offspring in laboratory and field). [3] Effect of pre-inhabitation and viruses on the host plant nutrient content (amino acids, total sterols, and simple sugars-mg/g). These data might be used by researchers studying positive interactions, effects of viruses on host plants and vectors, phytochemistry of the wheat plant, and feeding behavior of phloem-feeders.

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    The lesser hairy­footed dunnart (<i>Sminthopsis youngsoni, Dasyuridae</i>) is a generalist marsupial insectivore in arid Australia, but consumes wolf spiders (<i>Lycosa spp., Lycosidae</i>) disproportionately often relative to their availability. Here, we tested whether lycosids have relatively high energy or nutrient contents compared to other invertebrates, and hence whether these aspects of food quality can explain selective predation of lycosids by <i>S.youngsoni</i>. Energy, lipid and protein composition of representatives of 10 arthropod families that are eaten by <i>S. youngsoni</i> in the Simpson Desert were ascertained using microbomb calorimetry, chloroform-methanol extraction and Dumas combustion. Differences between invertebrate groups were assessed using separate analyses of variance (ANOVAs) and appropriate post-hoc tests. These analyses were performed using this data.

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    The data set contains information on Camera Trap Fauna Survey conducted in the Samford Peri-urban Site in 2017. Information on the camera trap site location, height, observation time, species identification and related field remarks have been presented in this data set.

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files from Daintree Rainforest SuperSite, Cape Tribulation. The site is located at the Daintree Rainforest Observatory in lowland complex mesophyll vine forest near Cape Tribulation. The site has more than 80 species including canopy trees belonging to the <em>Arecaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Rutaceae, Meliaceae, Myristicaceae</em> and <em>Icacinaceae</em> families. For additional site information, see <a href="https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/daintree-rainforest-supersite">Daintree Rainforest SuperSite</a></p> <p>In 2020 four acoustic recorders were set up to collect audio data continuously as part of the Australian Acoustic Observatory (A2O) project. Two recorders were placed in relatively wet habitats and two in relatively dry habitats.</p>

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files from Robson Creek Rainforest SuperSite. The 25 hectare site lies on the Atherton Tablelands in the wet tropical rainforests of Australia at 680-740&nbsp;m elevation. It is situated in Danbulla National Park within the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. The forest is classified as Regional Ecosystem (RE) 7.3.36a, complex mesophyll vine forest. The climate is seasonal with approximately 60% of rain falling between January and March and the landform is moderately inclined with a low relief. There are 208 species in the site, and maximum canopy height is 44&nbsp;m. All stems ≥ 10&nbsp;cm diameter are measured, tagged and mapped. For additional site information, see <a href="https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/robson-creek-rainforest-supersite">Robson Creek Rainforest SuperSite</a></p> <p>In 2020 four acoustic recorders were set up to collect audio data continuously as part of the Australian Acoustic Observatory (A2O) project. Two recorders were placed in relatively wet habitats and two in relatively dry habitats.</p>

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files from Gingin Banksia Woodland SuperSite. The site was established in 2011 and is located in a natural woodland of high species diversity with an overstorey dominated by Banksia species. For additional site information, see <a href="https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/gingin-banksia-woodland-supersite/">Gingin Banksia Woodland SuperSite</a></p> <p>In 2020 four acoustic recorders were set up to collect audio data continuously as part of the Australian Acoustic Observatory (A2O) project. Two recorders were placed in relatively wet habitats and two in relatively dry habitats.</p>

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files for TERN Mitchell Grass Rangeland SuperSite. Long-term recordings of the environment can be used to identify sound sources of interest, characterise the soundscape, aid in the assessment of fauna biodiversity, monitor temporal trends and track environmental changes.</p> <p>Mitchell Grass Rangeland SuperSite is located at Rosebank Station, approximately 11 km south-east of Longreach in Queensland. The site is arid tussock grassland with a variety of grass species including <em>Astrebla lappacea</em> and <em>Astrebla squarrosa</em> over black vertosol soil that supports sheep and beef cattle grazing. For additional site information, see https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/mitchell-grass-rangeland-supersite/.</p> <p>In 2020 four acoustic recorders were set up to collect audio data continuously as part of the Australian Acoustic Observatory (A2O) project. Two recorders were placed in relatively wet habitats and two in relatively dry habitats.</p>

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files from Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt site. Tumbarumba site was established in 2000 by CSIRO and started measurements in 2001. The 1&nbsp;ha plot was established in 2015 in collaboration with TERN. The overstorey is dominated by <em>Eucalyptus delegatensis</em> (Alpine Ash) and <em>Eucalyptus dalrympleana</em> (Mountain Gum). <p>In 2020 four acoustic recorders were set up to collect audio data continuously as part of the Australian Acoustic Observatory (A2O) project. Two recorders were placed in relatively wet habitats and two in relatively dry habitats.</p>

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    The lesser hairy-footed dunnart (<i>Sminthopsis youngsoni, Dasyuridae</i>) is a generalist marsupial insectivore in arid Australia, but consumes wolf spiders (<i>Lycosa spp., Lycosidae</i>) disproportionately often relative to their availability. This project tested the hypothesis that this disproportionate predation is a product of frequent encounter rates between the interactants due to high overlap in their diets and use of space and time. This data set focuses on dietary overlap, with diet and predatory behaviour of wolf spiders (<i>Lycosa spp.</i>), the lesser hairy-footed dunnart (<i>Sminthopsis youngsoni</i>) and prowling spiders (<i>Miturga spp.</i>, which represent other common invertebrate predators) were determined by tracking individuals and directly observing prey captures. Seventeen wolf spiders, 10 prowling spiders and 5 dunnarts were captured from Main Camp site in the Simpson Desert, south-western Queensland during 2016 with 30, 13 and 13 direct prey captures witnessed for each species respectively. This data is used for calculating overlap between prey taxa and prey size between these predators using the symmetrical version of MacArthur and Levin's and Pianka's overlap equation. However, it can also be used as a case study for calculating overlap between other species-groups.

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    <p>This dataset contains audio files for Wombat Stringybark Eucalypt SuperSite. The site was established in 2010 in the Wombat State Forest in Central Victoria. The site is dry eucalypt forest with main species <em>Eucalyptus obliqua</em>, <em>Eucalyptus radiata</em> and <em>Euclayptus rubida</em>. For additional site information, see <a href="https://www.tern.org.au/tern-observatory/tern-ecosystem-processes/wombat-stringybark-eucalypt-supersite">Wombat Stringybark Eucalypt SuperSite</a></p> <p>In 2020 four acoustic recorders were set up to collect audio data continuously as part of the Australian Acoustic Observatory (A2O) project. Two recorders were placed in relatively wet habitats and two in relatively dry habitats.</p>