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2023

94 record(s)
 
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    <br>This release consists of flux tower measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer using eddy covariance techniques. Data were processed using PyFluxPro (v3.5.0) as described by Isaac et al. (2017). PyFluxPro produces a final, gap-filled product with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) partitioned into Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER).</br><br> The site is woodland savanna with an overstory co-dominated by tree species <em>Eucalyptus tetrodonta</em>, <em>Corymbia latifolia</em>, <em>Terminalia grandiflora</em>, <em>Sorghum sp.</em> and <em>Heteropogon triticeus</em>. Average canopy height measures 16.4&nbsp;m. Elevation of the site is close to 110&nbsp; m and mean annual precipitation at a nearby Bureau of Meteorology site is 1,170&nbsp;mm. Maximum temperatures range from 31.2 &nbsp;°C (in June) to 37.5&nbsp;°C (in October), while minimum temperatures range from 12.6&nbsp;°C (in July) to 23.8&nbsp;°C (in January). Maximum temperatures range seasonally by 6.3&nbsp;°C and minimum temperatures by 11.2&nbsp;°C. <br /><br />The instrument mast is 23&nbsp;m tall. Heat, water vapour and carbon dioxide measurements are taken using the open-path eddy flux technique. Temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind direction, rainfall, incoming and reflected shortwave radiation and net radiation are measured above the canopy.<br /><br>Ancillary measurements taken at the site include LAI, leaf-scale physiological properties (gas exchange, leaf isotope ratios, nitrogen and chlorophyll concentrations), vegetation optical properties and soil physical properties. Airborne based remote sensing (Lidar and hyperspectral measurements) was carried out across the site in September 2008. <br /><br />

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    <br>This release consists of flux tower measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer using eddy covariance techniques. Data were processed using PyFluxPro (v3.4.15) as described by Isaac et al. (2017). PyFluxPro produces a final, gap-filled product with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) partitioned into Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER).</br> <br>This is a topographically flat area, primarily comprised of the following soil types: sandy loams, scattered clays, red brown earths, transitional red brown earth, sands over clay and deep sands. Stream valleys and layered soil and sedimentary materials are found across the landscape.</br> <br>The flux station tower extends to 20&nbsp;m, however flux measurements are recorded from slightly lower than this. Mean annual precipitation from the nearby Bureau of Meteorology is 465&nbsp;mm. Maximum temperatures ranged from 16.6&nbsp;°C (in July) to 37.4&nbsp;°C (in January), while minimum temperatures ranged from 11.8&nbsp;°C (in July) to 29.0&nbsp;°C (in January). Maximum temperatures varied on a seasonal basis by approximately 20.8&nbsp;°C and minimum temperatures by 17.2&nbsp;°C.</br> <br>The site is within a wider research area (60 x 60&nbsp;km) that supports a network of flux stations, which have been in operation since late 2001.</br>

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    <br>This release consists of flux tower measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer using eddy covariance techniques. Data were processed using PyFluxPro (v3.4.15) as described by Isaac et al. (2017). PyFluxPro produces a final, gap-filled product with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) partitioned into Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER).</br> <br>Robson Creek site is part of the Far North Queensland (FNQ) Rainforest Site along with affiliated monitoring sites at Cape Tribulation (Daintree Rainforest Observatory) and Cow Bay (Daintree Discovery Centre). The flux station is located at the foothills of the Lamb Range, part of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, and north-west of a 25&nbsp;ha census plot established by CSIRO in 2012.</br> <br>The forest is classified as Regional Ecosystem (RE) 7.3.36a, complex mesophyll vine forest (Queensland Government, 2006). There are 211 species in the adjacent 25&nbsp;ha plot, and average tree height is 28&nbsp;m, ranging from 23 to 44&nbsp;m. Elevation of the site is 711&nbsp;m and mean annual precipitation is 2000&nbsp;mm. The upland rainforests of the Atherton Tablelands are some of the most biodiverse and carbon dense forests in Australia. The landform of the 25&nbsp;ha plot which is in the dominant wind direction from the station is moderately inclined with a low relief, a 30&nbsp;m high ridge running north/south through the middle of the plot and a 40&nbsp;m high ridge running north/south on the eastern edge of the plot.</br> <br>The instruments are mounted on a free standing station at 40&nbsp;m. Fluxes of heat, water vapour and carbon dioxide are measured using the open-path eddy flux technique. Supplementary measurements above the canopy include temperature, humidity, windspeed, wind direction, rainfall, incoming and reflected shortwave radiation and net radiation.</br> <br>Note: Level 3 data for 2015 - 2018 were updated in 2018 correcting a rainfall issue in 2015 and a wind direction issue 2016 - 2018. A data gap from 2019-02-14 to 2019-02-21 was due to a major power supply failure.</br>

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    This dataset contains predictions of the aboveground biomass density (AGBD) for Australia for 2020. Data were generated by the Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) NASA mission, which used a full-waveform LIDAR attached to the International Space Station to provide the first global, high-resolution observations of forest vertical structure. Data include both Level 4A (~25&nbsp;m footprints) and Gridded Level 4B (1&nbsp;km x 1&nbsp;km) Version 2. The Australian portion of the data was extracted from the original global datasets <a href="https://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/dsviewer.pl?ds_id=2056">GEDI L4A Footprint Level Aboveground Biomass Density</a> and <a href="https://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/dsviewer.pl?ds_id=2299">GEDI L4B Gridded Aboveground Biomass Density</a>.

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    <br>This release consists of flux tower measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer using eddy covariance techniques. Data were processed using PyFluxPro (v3.5.0) as described by Isaac et al. (2017). PyFluxPro produces a final, gap-filled product with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) partitioned into Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER).</br> <br>Samford flux station is situated on an improved (<em>Paspalum dilatum</em>) pasture in the humid subtropical climatic region of coastal south-east Queensland. Located only 20&nbsp;km from the centre of Brisbane city, Samford Valley provides an ideal case study to examine the impact of urbanisation and land use change on ecosystem processes. The valley covers an area of some 82&nbsp;km<sup>2</sup> and is drained in the southern regions by the Samford creek, which extends some 13&nbsp;km to Samford Village and into the South Pine River. The Samford Valley is historically a rural area experiencing intense urbanisation, with the population increasing almost 50% in the 10 years to 2006 (Morton Bay Regional Council, 2011). Within the Samford valley study region, the Samford Ecological Research Facility (SERF) not only represents a microcosm of current and historical land uses in the valley, but provides a unique opportunity to intensively study various aspects of ecosystem health in a secure, integrated and long term research capacity. Mean annual minimum and maximum temperatures at a nearby Bureau of Meteorology site are 13.1&nbsp;°C and 25.6&nbsp;°C respectively while average rainfall is 1102&nbsp;mm.</br>

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    This dataset indicates the presence and persistence of water across Queensland between 1988 and 2022. Water is one of the world’s most important resources as it’s critical for human consumption, agriculture, the persistence of flora and fauna species and other ecosystem services. Information about the spatial distribution and prevalence of water is necessary for a range of business, modelling, monitoring, risk assessment, and conservation activities. The water count product is based on water index and water masks for Queensland (Danaher & Collett 2006) and represents the proportion of observations with water present across the Landsat time series as a fraction of total number of possible observations for the period 1 Jan 1988 to 31 Dec 2022. The product has two bands where band 1 is the number of times water was present across the time series, and band 2 is the count of unobscured (i.e. non-null) input pixels, or number of total observations for that pixel. Cloud, cloud-shadow, steep slopes and topographic shadow can obscure the ability to count water presence.

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    Evaluation of the morphological variation within the genus <em>Polyosma</em> (<em>Escalloniaceae</em>) of Australia, New Caledonia and Papuasia based on herbarium specimens to clarify the taxonomy of the recognized species in this genus. These data also identified several previously unpublished species that are new to science.

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    <br>Tropical rainforests play a powerful role in mediating the global climate through the exchange and storage of carbon and water. Climate change is expected to generate higher atmospheric water demand in many areas, potentially increasing the rate of evaporation. In this study, we show that higher evaporative demand may in fact lead to lower fluxes of water from tropical rainforests and a reduced capacity of these forests to store carbon.</br> The record contains meteorological and forest inventory data in addition to data on soil water potential, sapflow measurements and tree hydraulic vulnerability measures from Robson Creek and Cow Bay study sites in Far North Queensland. The measurements occurred over a period of two years form 2019 to 2020.

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    <br>This release consists of flux tower measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer using eddy covariance techniques. Data were processed using PyFluxPro (v3.4.15) as described by Isaac et al. (2017). PyFluxPro produces a final, gap-filled product with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) partitioned into Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER). <br /> <br /> Located in a 5 km<sup>2</sup> block of relatively uniform open-forest savanna, the site is representative of high rainfall, frequently burnt tropical savanna. <br /><br /> Tropical savanna in Australia occupies 1.9 million km<sup>2</sup> across the north and given the extent of this biome, understanding biogeochemical cycles, impacts of fire on sequestration, vegetation and fauna is a national priority. In the NT, savanna ecosystems are largely intact in terms of tree cover, with only modest levels of land use change. Despite this, there is evidence of a loss of biodiversity, most likely due to shifts in fire regimes and a loss of patchiness in the landscape. Approximately 40 % of the savanna burn every year and understanding fire impacts on fauna and flora is essential for effective land management. <br /><br />

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    <br>This release consists of flux tower measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer using eddy covariance techniques. Data were processed using PyFluxPro (v3.5.0) as described by Isaac et al. (2017). PyFluxPro produces a final, gap-filled product with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) partitioned into Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER).</br><br> Great Western Woodlands (GWW) comprise a 16 million&nbsp;ha mosaic of temperate woodland, shrubland and mallee vegetation in south-west Western Australia. The region has remained relatively intact since European settlement, owing to the variable rainfall and lack of readily accessible groundwater. The woodland component is globally unique in that nowhere else do woodlands occur at as little as 220&nbsp;mm mean annual rainfall. Further, other temperate woodlands around the world have typically become highly fragmented and degraded through agricultural use. Great Western Woodlands Site was established in 2012 in the Credo Conservation Reserve. The site is in semi-arid woodland and was operated as a pastoral lease from 1907 to 2007. The core 1&nbsp;ha plot is characterised by <em>Eucalyptus salmonophloia</em> (salmon gum), with <em>Eucalyptus salubris</em> and <em>Eucalyptus clelandii</em> dominating other research plots. The flux station is located in salmon gum woodland.