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    Mating system and fitness data for families of <em>Eucalyptus socialis</em> grown in common garden experiments. Families collected across a fragmentation gradient. Open-pollinated progeny arrays were collected and reared in the common garden experiments. These open-pollinated progeny arrays were also genotyped at microsatellite loci to generate the mating system data. Data showed association between fragmentation on mating system, which in turn impacted fitness. Please contact owner prior to use.

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    The dataset contains distribution data for the Yellow Crazy Ant (Anoplolepis gracilipes) and scale insects (eg Parasaissetia nigra, Dysmicoccus finitimus), collected during the Waypoint Survey component of the Pulu Keeling National Park Island-wide Survey (IWS). The aim of the Waypoint Survey is to monitor densities of the invasive Yellow Crazy Ant (Anoplolepis gracilipes) and to detect establishment of any new scale insect species. The other components of the IWS (Transit Survey and Ink Card and Nocturnal Survey) are recorded in separate submissions.

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    Microsatellite genotype data for 3 eucalypt species. Data include progeny and adults from across a gradient of habitat fragmentation. These microsatellite data could be further used in additional analyses, e.g. genetic diversity. Samples collected from stands on eucalypts as follows: non-neighbouring adult trees had leaf and seeds collected. Leaf was used to genotype the adults. Seeds were germinated, tissue then collected, and the same microsatellites genotyped - i.e. open-pollinated progeny arrays. The dataset is possibly useful for meta-analysis or review of effects of habitat fragmentation on plants (e.g. mating system, genetic diversity etc).

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    This dataset consists of measurements of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer in lowland tropical rainforest at the Daintree Discovery Centre near Cow Bay in Far North Queensland, using eddy covariance techniques. <br /> <br /> The Cow Bay flux station was established in December 2008 and managed by James Cook University. The forest is classified as complex mesophyll vine forest, there are 94 species in the core 1Ha, and average tree height is 22m. Elevation of the site is 90m and mean annual precipitation is 3935mm. The Daintree Rainforest is one of the most biodiverse forests in Australia.The instruments are mounted on a walk-up tourist tower at 35m. Fluxes of heat, water vapour and carbon dioxide are measured using the open-path eddy flux technique. Supplementary measurements above the canopy include temperature, humidity, windspeed, wind direction, rainfall, incoming and reflected shortwave radiation and net radiation.The early years 2009 - 12 had several data gaps. Shadowing of the radiometric equipment continues to cause artifacts on the radiometers - these can be seen as reduction in downwelling radiation with solar inclination. The site is part of the FNQ Rainforest SuperSite - associated with the Daintree node, which is part of the TERN Australian SuperSite Network (ASN). <br/> For additional site information, see https://supersites.tern.org.au/supersites/fnqr-daintree .<br /> This data is also available at http://data.ozflux.org.au .

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    <p> The dataset aims at studying associations between mating system parameters and fitness in natural populations of trees. Fifty-eight open-pollinated progeny arrays were collected from trees in three populations. Progeny were planted in a reciprocal transplant trial. Fitness was measured by family establishment rates. We genotyped all trees and their progeny at eight microsatellite loci. Planting site had a strong effect on fitness, but seed provenance and seed provenance × planting site did not. Populations had comparable mating system parameters and were generally outcrossed, experienced low biparental inbreeding and high levels of multiple paternity. As predicted, seed families that had more multiple paternities also had higher fitness, and no fitness-inbreeding correlations were detected. Demonstrating that fitness was most affected by multiple paternities rather than inbreeding, we provide evidence supporting the constrained inbreeding hypothesis; i.e. that multiple paternity may impact on fitness over and above that of inbreeding, particularly for preferentially outcrossing trees at life stages beyond seed development. This dataset could potentially be reused for meta-analysis or review of effects of habitat fragmentation on plants (e.g. pollination, mating system, genetic diversity etc). Please contact owner prior to re-use. </p> <p>this is part of the authors' PhD at the University of Adelaide, supervised by Prof Andrew Lowe, Dr Mike Gardner and Dr Kym Ottewell. Main goals of PhD 1. Examine and quantify the impact of fragmentation and tree density on mating patterns, and how this may vary with pollinators of differing mobility 2. Determine the theoretical expectations and perform empirical tests of mating pattern-fitness relationships in trees 3. Explore the plant genetic resource management implications that arise from the observations in aims 1 and 2 </p>